#1
I had Carpel Tunnel for 9 months which meant I could not practice properly for 6 months. Anything over an hour and my wrist would start to become painful. I am naturally predisposed to get Carpel Tunnel of my freakishly large hands (which put more strain on my unusually short ligaments).

Anyway, I didnt practice properly for 6 months because I was still at risk of injury and I have had numerous medical problems which made it hard to get up (I had mono and I now have some other infection too which keeps me in bed for long periods). This summer, for one week I practiced for 14 hours a day without fail, and my health suffered some more. Then I had to get a job to get out of debt and now I have lost 3 months of practice extra...

So, I have been out of practice for 9 months.

The problem is this: I am worse than I was 9 months ago. I can still play, I still know all my theory and how to apply it, but my hands have "forgotten" how to play. I have been practicing a lot to get back up to standard and its been a month now and Im still nowhere near where I was 9 months ago....

How long will it take me to get back on track because at this rate Im thinking of giving it up. Every two weeks Im ill and it distracts me from practice. Anything more than 20 minutes and Im physically tired. Before now I was doing 4 - 6 hours a night on a University day and 12 hours on the weekends.

Help! How long before I get back to where I was 9 months ago?

(I didnt know where to put this thread)
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#2
Well, even though you would be playing just 20 minutes you can make a dramatic difference in your playing if you use that time well i.e you practice with correct methods. After such a long pause you need to program your fingers again and only way to do that is to play everything really slow and perfectly. I'm sure your endurance will build if you keep practicing and increasing the length of each session slowly. Other than that, it's hard to say how long it will take but I can assure you that if you practice your licks like I said, it won't take forever to get where you were.
#4
Quote by Stratwizard
Well, even though you would be playing just 20 minutes you can make a dramatic difference in your playing if you use that time well i.e you practice with correct methods. After such a long pause you need to program your fingers again and only way to do that is to play everything really slow and perfectly. I'm sure your endurance will build if you keep practicing and increasing the length of each session slowly. Other than that, it's hard to say how long it will take but I can assure you that if you practice your licks like I said, it won't take forever to get where you were.


Thanks dude.

Ive been going over things slowly again just to get everything on par but its the frustration of knowing what I was like and comparing it to where I am now.
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#6
Quote by Guitardude19
Thanks dude.

Ive been going over things slowly again just to get everything on par but its the frustration of knowing what I was like and comparing it to where I am now.


I feel for you. Sorry, but i think it's just a matter of going through it.

The good new is, you can get as good as you were, and it'll be quick if you practice properly and had decent technique in the first place.

Shawn Lane had to quit guitar for 6 years due to hand problems, and he was no slouch after a years practice.
#7
Quote by Freepower
I feel for you. Sorry, but i think it's just a matter of going through it.

The good new is, you can get as good as you were, and it'll be quick if you practice properly and had decent technique in the first place.

Shawn Lane had to quit guitar for 6 years due to hand problems, and he was no slouch after a years practice.


Thanks dude.

I guess patience and proper practice as before is all I need then.
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#8
The optimistic approach is to think that by re learning a load of stuff you can learn it better so to speak.

Ie, picking the 'correct' way from the start and making a point of fixing all the stuff which bugged your technique before now whilst it's easier.
#9
Quote by Cnaiur
The optimistic approach is to think that by re learning a load of stuff you can learn it better so to speak.

Ie, picking the 'correct' way from the start and making a point of fixing all the stuff which bugged your technique before now whilst it's easier.


Thats basically all I ll be doing lol. Just getting out the "knots" so to speak until I can get back to where I was.

Every time I practice I use a metronome and it can be on all day (damn I have spent a lot of money on 9 volt batteries). I always start at 60 bpm and move up by 5 every few minutes until I hit speeds where I start to break down.

An example would be where I was practicing sweep picking in triplets. I started at 60 and moved to 65, 70, 77, 80 etc until I hit 130 where I started to break up. I carried on 132, 138, 140 and then went back to 120 and stayed there because I noticed at 125 and 130 I wasnt as accurate. Everything I practice is like this and within a few weeks I will be up at 140 comfortable and sloppy 10 - 15 bpm after it.

In order to gauge how much of a come down I have had, 9 months ago I was sloppy with 16ths at 176 but comfortable at 160... Now I can barely play cleanly and accurately at 120 bpm with 16ths..... I know its not all about speed but I am annoyed that I have fallen that far behind.
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!