#1
I finally am getting into the habit of cleaning my strings after playing, just wiping them down with a dry cloth. I saw a **** load of dirt come off after cleaning. The tone on the G, B, and e strings was noticeably zingier, just like when they were first put on the guitar. I have a question though, if you haven't cleaned the strings in a while, does any dirt get embedded into the tiny notches of the bass strings after a while? If so, can it happen to the higher strings too? I don't think it can happen to higher strings cause they're just too smooth and have no notches on em.

Another question just came to mind too, regarding guitar maintenance. I just had a closer look at my frets, and noticed they all are starting to get worn, with flat tops instead of being rounded, but they're not that bad...yet. Anyone have any advice on when to deal with that? As I heard it causes fret buzz if not taken care of after a while.
Gear:
- G&L Tribute Series Legacy Guitar
- Behringer V-tone GM108 15-watt amp
Last edited by ScruffMcGruff at Sep 1, 2007,
#2
yeah it can get stuck in the coil of the thicker strings. you can get a string cleaner and conditioner for about $5-$10.
#3
String cleaner? Sweet, I'll have to look into that. As I look closer at my bass strings I already see that in the middle of some notches there's a faint brown color... I guess thats all the crap from my fingers. lol
Gear:
- G&L Tribute Series Legacy Guitar
- Behringer V-tone GM108 15-watt amp
#4
I use what they call in the US, "rubbing alcohol" on a rag. I've found that it cleans both water soluble gunk (dirt, sweat) as well as solvent souble gunk (dead skin that sticks because of finger oils). Most guitar finishes are resistant to isopropanol, but before you try it, test it on a small spot on your neck and body finish. I got blasted on another site for even suggesting this, but try it. It works on Gibson and Fender finishes. The big problem they all screamed about is that it may damage the finish and dries out rosewood fretboards. I haven't found this to be true and consider it an urban myth. When rosewood fretboards are saturated with your finger oils, it will start to build up and form those disgusting and criminal deposits you find on friends guitars. I pass when they ask "wanna play it?"
#5
Quote by GotRock?
I use what they call in the US, "rubbing alcohol" on a rag.

or he could use the stuff thats meant for it, with no risk of damaging his guitar.
#6
Why don't you read that back of that bottle of magic elixar called "string cleaner" in the "Ingrdients" area and let us know what's in it. Isopranol, or or do they list "everything that's wonderful in the world"?
#8
Quote by GotRock?
Why don't you read that back of that bottle of magic elixar called "string cleaner" in the "Ingrdients" area and let us know what's in it. Isopranol, or or do they list "everything that's wonderful in the world"?


it doesnt have ingredients on it.
#9
Quote by Metallica_Man55
i didn't know that cleaning the strings would change the sound of the guitar. i'll have to try that.


Well, I certainly noticed a difference when I cleaned my strings. I think as the dirt accumulates on the lighter G, B, and e strings, it weighs them down, causing them to resonate less when picked and make less sound.

Thanks GotRock? for such a detailed answer. I don't have a rosewood guitar body so there shouldn't be a problem.
Gear:
- G&L Tribute Series Legacy Guitar
- Behringer V-tone GM108 15-watt amp