#1
I often visit the Fender Player's Club website, and ocassionally learn some of the tabs that are on it.

Interesting enough, they include information on the song (well, segment of the song) that you learn.

Anyways, in some of the readings I find mention of guitarists who play using one scale, but the combine it with another scale or a mode at certain points.

So what allows one to do this? I understand that it would work theoretically if the scales and modes were in the same key, but is there a certain way for this to work properly?
#2
it depends on the chords under the lead part
"Blues is what you got when everything else is
gone." - J.Lansdowne
#3
i'd say it's most common when they're in say a majorish progression, and they're soloing with like the major scale, but then they move into the mixolydian because the flatted seventh works well for a bluesy feel in one part of a solo, or they're in a minory progression and they use both the aeolian and say the dorian, as both are similar, but the digression into a different note, in this case the 6th instead of the flatted sixt in the dorian mode, allows for a good feel, maybe they're using it to do a chromatic walkdown from the 6th, the flatted 6th, and then the 5th in a lick. it's all a matter of them knowing the effect they wanna make, and the notes they know they want to play in one part of the solo, and moving out of the scale for that note. they probably aren't thinking "ok, i'm gonna try and combine the major and mixolydian scales for this solo" because that's not what's gonna make it sound great. what'll make it sound great is getting the feeling you want, and using more than one scale if it's necessary to do so.

edit: ^ or yea, they might just be say changing the scale to play like a major scale over each chord played or something, which would change the overall scale, but they're just playing the major scale of the chord they're on. that's a possibility
Last edited by Glen'sHeroicAct at Sep 1, 2007,
#5
www.fenderplayersclub.com

Okay, I'm beginning to see what you guys are talking about.

I'm looking into this because when I play with my band I tend to solo with one scale (of course, that particular scale may change with the song), and playing with those same five, six, or seven notes, even at different octaves, will begin to sound tedious after a while.

I want to be able to throw in some notes that sound good, but maybe even add some tension and then find a way to resolve it so that the music remains interesting.

Right now my band has been working on covering Hot 'Lanta by The Allman Brothers Band, so I've been using the Blues scale during the solo, but I want to add some variety to it.
#6
try the major pentatonic in there, maybe some mixolydian and maybe even dorian. just make sure that you only throw these notes in every once in a while and dont rely on any one scale other than the blues scale. that sounds best for blues.
"Blues is what you got when everything else is
gone." - J.Lansdowne
#7
Thanks.

I mean, you simply would love to have more options than what you have with the A Blues with, you know?

I remember reading a Derek Trucks interview once, and he basically said, "After a while, throw a note that's out of scale, or even out of key, in there,", so that's something I'm going to be looking into more (of coures, you don't want to play just any note, but something that adds some tension.
#8
satriani says something along the lines of 'i was taught that the mind can hear 14 notes out of key before hearing dissonance'

its an interesting concept to mess around with, you can do stuff like lydian and ionian, or dorian and aeolian, or you can go completely off and play lydian with some phrygian dominant notes in
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#9
one trick I learned is if you switch between the blues scale and the mixolydian scale (pentatonic version), or mode 5 of the pentatonic scale, you can add a little bit of sweet to that sour blues scale. But dont stay in mode 5 too long cause then it will be hard to change back and then you have a to happy sounding lick
#10
if you're getting worried about changing scales and going 'out of key', you're going the wrong way about theory. a little dissonance is a good thing. the trick is in knowing how to use this. know what sounds different intervals make, and know how this can make things sound interesting.

i mean, someone brought up blues. i had some great lessons on blues. we started off just using the regular straight up minor pentatonic, being strict, then started allowing more tones, gradually, thinking about what effect they had. by the end, we were utilising almost all the notes on the fretboard in some way.
my name is matt. you can call me that if you like.
Last edited by Gurgle!Argh! at Sep 2, 2007,
#11
Believe me, I realize dissonance is a good thing (when used correctly), which is why I mentioned Derek Trucks talking about it.

It's just a matter of using it correctly that I need to work on.
#12
Nowadays, I'm working on intervalic relationships - i.e, the relationship two notes have with each other. For example, the m2 (minor secon : a semitone) is the most dissonant. So, if I want to add some of the latter, I don't have to go learn scales like F# Kumoi or C Double Harmonic.

Here are some lessons on the hopscotch method of playing:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=hop&w=lessons
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#14
Quote by EZLN libertad
satriani says something along the lines of 'i was taught that the mind can hear 14 notes out of key before hearing dissonance'

its an interesting concept to mess around with, you can do stuff like lydian and ionian, or dorian and aeolian, or you can go completely off and play lydian with some phrygian dominant notes in


I've seen that video, except, you can notice it after like 5 or 6... I never really understood that very well.

And I don't think he used the word dissonace I think he said before they noticed the key change...

As for your scale problem, try extending the blues scale to the minor with a b5, or possibly using a b7 in there to give it a more exotic feel. The easiest one is just a short chromatic run hammered on for a line, say playing 5h6h7h8 on G, adds some variety...
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.