#1
hey. i play guitar and sing lead vox in an alternative/indie/rock band called parallel fiction. we're all in high school and dont have much money, and most of our equipment came from pawn shops and garage sales. anyway my question is this. is there anything anyone can suggest as to how i could effectively, and cheaply, get our vocals heard when we're practicing?

currently what we do is plug all our instruments and mics into a thousand year old peavy 6-channel mixer (its a piece of crap. its about the size of a microwave, and one of the speaker outs doesnt work. i think its been dropped several times by who knows how many previous owners.), and then run that into the external amp input on my guitar amp. we can get our guitars and keyboard up to a level that competes with the drums easily enough, but we cant turn the vox up very high before it starts squealing, and the bass blares the speakers. as a result, everything sounds grungier than our style cause of the buzzy bass and the fact that we have to scream to get our vocals heard.

any help would be appreciated, and if you live around dallas tx, you can see us play at the door in october.

thanks, Nathan.
"Where did i go wrong?"
#2
get some more amps
Quote by AgentWiggles
Thanks, douche.


Quote by SlayingDragons
Dude...



Gear:
Ibanez SZ 520QM
Ibanez RG 450DXB
Fender Big Apple Stratocaster
Pod XT Live
Peavey XXX Half Stack
Peavey Bandit 112
and a soul of Rock n' Roll
#3
I know money is tight but I really think you guys need to buy separate amps. Save and save man thats what I had to do with my first band and thats what my current band is gonna end up doing sooner or later. From what you said your running everything from the mixer straight into your guitar amp? I may not have understood you but if this is the case then thats a very bad thing. Especially running the bass guitar into the amp. That could do some damage to your amp. As for a quick fix solution, you guys could pool your money together and get a separate little P.A. just for vocals that has more output and can cut through the mix. But please save up your money and stop putting your amp through this.
-Denny
PRS Singlecut Trem

Member #2 of the Coheed and Cambria fanclub, PM dementedpuppy to join.
#4
What exactly is being miced and what is plugged into the mixer and what is the mixer plugged into?

Maybe buy a cheapo PA system just for practicing?
#6
Get another amp for bass. How big is the speaker you are using?

Quote by emad
jthm_guitarist
Warned for trolling!


Quote by metal4eva_22
Didn't you say that you had a stuffed fox that you would occasionally fuck?

Quote by Axelfox
It's not a fox,it's a wolf.
#7
Quote by OsirisProtocol

From what you said your running everything from the mixer straight into your guitar amp?


yea, but the amp has an input in the back for an external amp, so we plug it into that. so the mixer is doing all the amplifying, the amp is just attached to the speakers.

Quote by jthm_guitarist
Get another amp for bass. How big is the speaker you are using?


there's 2 cones in the amp, looks to be about 10" each. i'm not sure if thats what you're asking for.
"Where did i go wrong?"
#8
Quote by aseme
What exactly is being miced and what is plugged into the mixer and what is the mixer plugged into?

Maybe buy a cheapo PA system just for practicing?


in the mixer we've got 2 mics for vocals, an acoustic, an electric, a bass, and sometimes a keyboard.
"Where did i go wrong?"
#9
Quote by Panchotwana
yea, but the amp has an input in the back for an external amp, so we plug it into that. so the mixer is doing all the amplifying, the amp is just attached to the speakers.


Its not just the amp itself I am talking about. Speakers used in guitar amps aren't exactly made to handle bass frequencies.
-Denny
PRS Singlecut Trem

Member #2 of the Coheed and Cambria fanclub, PM dementedpuppy to join.
#11
Its hard but think of it this way. Save up the cash now and don't have to worry about your guitar amp going out on you because of your current situation.
-Denny
PRS Singlecut Trem

Member #2 of the Coheed and Cambria fanclub, PM dementedpuppy to join.
#12
I think you need to buy a separate amp, dude. Or just something separate to amp the vocals. I understand... money.
#14
trust me when i say im singing loud enough. i go home hoarse.
"Where did i go wrong?"
#15
Well while you guys saving do you think you could do some acoustic practices? Like have the drummer play a djemba or some other smaller drum to keep rhythm and have the bassist plug into the mixer and speaker (not the guitar amp) and just have a go with the acoustic and vocals? That way you would be heard a bit better and you guys could still practice.
-Denny
PRS Singlecut Trem

Member #2 of the Coheed and Cambria fanclub, PM dementedpuppy to join.
#16
Don't you dare try to sing over them.
Save your money and buy separate amps.
My band, there's one amp per guitarist, and two amps for vocals. One is a behringer combo amp, and the other a Fender amp from like 1960. It's gross but works.
We use one as a monitor for the drummer. It's ghetto as hell but works really well.

Now if I could just get the other guitarist to turn his amp down...
#17
edit

ok get yourself one or two Behringer 2400 keyboard/PA amps.
its got a good amount of inputs but with the amount of inputs you guys need i suggest two also to keep the bass or something separate

Also the 1 input is not something to be used with the other three...its different somehow and doesnt like being paired with the other inputs.

I suggest you counter this by getting an unpowered analog mixer like the Yamaha MG series. I use the 10/2 and it works great. You can feed the "ST Out" into inputs 2 and 3 on one KX1200 or inputs 2 on two KX1200 amps.

These PAs are good for a lot of different type sounds and should work ok for now.

pool your money into one pot and get amps for everyone.

that PA is a good start and can be used to monitor everyone later on

its cheap too...about $200 new if i remember correctly
Last edited by moody07747 at Sep 2, 2007,