#1
I'm asking for suggestions/ways of writing a rhythm over another and by that I mean two power chord progressions going on at the same time that are different.

I'm really trying to make better verses in songs, and I'd like to get two progressions going together but I'm having a bit of a problem. I'm talking metal-ish guitar btw.
#2
That's sounds like either way you put it , it will sound like **** haha, unless of course you speak of harmonizing.. than thats a different story
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#3
That's called harmony, and there's a lot of different ways to do it. One way is to use the fifth of the progression you're already playing, for example, if this is the progression you're playing:

C5 - D5 - G5

You could play G5 - A5 - D5 with it. You can really play anything you want along with it but usually using something like 3rds, 5ths, 7ths, etc. is the most common. Try using diminished or minor scales if you want to do metal.
#7
Quote by werty22
Two different power chords at the same time is going to sound like crap.


not necessarily

2 power chords can build up another chord, eg: a seventh chord
which might not sound that crap

lots of interesting stuff you can do with harmony
#8
^I realize that, but sevenths will probably sound like crap in a metal context with lots of distortion unless it's some kind of crazy prog-metal-jazz-fusion thing. Even then...
#9
Quote by werty22
^I realize that, but sevenths will probably sound like crap in a metal context with lots of distortion unless it's some kind of crazy prog-metal-jazz-fusion thing. Even then...


hey, metal needs a little bit of dissonance

if all else fails, just doubling up the some powerchord and octave higher adds to that huge wall of sound effect (go listen to anything by Devin Townsend )
#10
Quote by werty22
Two different power chords at the same time is going to sound like crap.

That's not true at all. I can think of a lot of times when songs in drop D tuning are played something like this:

e|---|
B|---|
G|---|
D|-5-|
A|-3-|
D|-3-|


Which is a fifth on a fifth, and it sounds cool.