#1
Looking through some of my favorite guitarists rigs, I find almsot none of them just use an amp, with pedals in front of it. It seems they all have a rack, loaded with effects, and a pre amp, power amp, and backups of those. I know combo amps/amp heads have both a power amp, and pre amp, but I'm not sure of exactly how they work, So my question is, how does a Pre amp, and Power amp work together in seperate units in a rack situation, and how would I use one with my current setup (Just as basic as it gets, guitar-> amp)?
#2
Inside your guitar amp there are two main parts- the preamp and poweramp. The fact that they use separate ones just gives them more versatility and choices.
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#3
So, let's say I bought a rocktron prophesy II, and set it on top of my amp. How would I get that working properly, without having two preamps running?
#4
Does your amp have an effects loop?
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#5
through the return of the effects loop. beware some effects loops are said to be noisy. probably not the way to professionaly accomplish this task, but good intermediary point before buying a seperate power amp.

Don't get too caught up on the rack stuff, half the pro's do it is because they can. You can get just as good sounds out of any other amp, half the reason the pro's do the rack thing is 1) you can get more of an individual tone if you start mixing and matching preamps and poweramps rather than just going for the "marshall" or "fender" tone, and 2) because they can.
Marty
#6
Yes, it's a B-52 AT212; it has the effects loop on a backplate of the amp

I see, so the point of a rack, is mainly to take their tone just that little extra step further, that allows it to sound a little less generic, and call it their "own"?
Last edited by Bullet FMV at Sep 2, 2007,
#7
Then plug your preamp output into the effects loop return, it should act like a regular amp. And you may need to stick a 1/4" jack with the ground and hot connected into the send to get it to work.
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#8
Most preamp system are just tubes like the Vox Valvetronix amps. Most racks are just for equalization and maybe effects. But most sound comes from guitarists amps, pedals, and of course guitar. The rest are just technical issues. Like the wireless cord system.
#9
Alright, thanks very much, you answered all the questions I had. It's greatly appreciated.
#10
Quote by FunkRocker321
Most preamp system are just tubes like the Vox Valvetronix amps. Most racks are just for equalization and maybe effects. But most sound comes from guitarists amps, pedals, and of course guitar. The rest are just technical issues. Like the wireless cord system.

Not really- the preamp of the amp is a vital part, it's where most of the tone comes from.
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#11
One of the greatest aspects of building a rack rig is the "on the fly" versatility. Let's say you need three preamps, two stereo power amps, and one effects processors to provide the range of sounds necessary for two 14 song sets. What's more is that you need each of the preamps EQ'd differently for almost every song and you need to change the parameters on the effects processor as well. The solution is simple: MIDI. It allows you to control everything on the rig from one floor unit and you can change everything at the same time with one tap of the footswitch. Admittedly the programming is kind of a pain, but when you play the same two 14 song sets every other night for two months at a time it's kind of easy to look over. Most people using complicated rack rigs are doing so for the ease of operation on stage. Admittedly some people do it because they can, and most appreciate the unique variety of tones available, but the simplicity of the user interface is the major selling point.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM