#1
Hey all. I have a question. I have a Fender American Strat with a floating trem. I LOVE the sound of thicker strings on it...but the bridge gets pulled really far away from the body of the guitar. Is this supposed to happen? Because it looks really abnormal. I currently have 9's on it. I would like to have 11's. Any help?
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Classic Ebony with gold hardware
Fender American Stratocaster 3 color sunburst maple fretboard tortoise shell pickguard
Martin 000-M Auditorium
Mesa Boogie F-50
Maxon OD-9
Dunlop 535Q Wah pedal
#3
you need to put more springs on your tremolo block in the back of the guitar
#4
i really prefer nines for punk and stuff. unless you are playing crazy metal, get thicker guages.
#5
The tension of your guitar is messed up. I'd take it to the shop and get it fixed by a pro unless you know exactly what you're doing. Get them to put on the type of strings you want, and then whenever you change strings the bridge won't pop up as long as you've used the same gauge strings.
#6
Quote by okinky
you need to put more springs on your tremolo block in the back of the guitar

Would that be what's needed to fix it? Is there any other way to do it? I have considered adding springs...but I've been too lazy to do so :-p

It doesn't matter what genre of music I'm playing on the guitar, I simply prefer the tone and sound and feel of thicker strings to the thinner strings.
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Classic Ebony with gold hardware
Fender American Stratocaster 3 color sunburst maple fretboard tortoise shell pickguard
Martin 000-M Auditorium
Mesa Boogie F-50
Maxon OD-9
Dunlop 535Q Wah pedal
#7
Yeah that's supposed to happen but you unscrew the plastic on the back of your guitar and loosen the little "springy things", I don't know what they're called. You need one of the small L wrenches that you should have got with your guitar. It happen with mine too and my guitar teacher showed me how to fix it.
Signatures are too mainstream
#8
Quote by diverdown04
Yeah that's supposed to happen but you unscrew the plastic on the back of your guitar and loosen the little "springy things", I don't know what they're called. You need one of the small L wrenches that you should have got with your guitar. It happen with mine too and my guitar teacher showed me how to fix it.



You just need one of those wrenches...wait... you LOOSEN the springs?
#9
You just need to tighten the springs in the back of the guitar. Any phillips head screwdriver will work. Just tighten the screws on the 'spring claw' until the bridge is back to where you want it. You could add another spring (or two) to the trem just to further stabilize it.

One problem you will run into by switching from .09 to .11 is going to be a change in intonation. You're going to have to fix the intonation, or else your guitar will never tune (or sound) right. If you don't know how to do that, take it to a shop.

If you're feeling adventurous, there are tons of tutorials on intonation adjustment. It's pretty simple one you realize what you're doing, but it is always time consuming.
Here's a good place to start...
Adjusting Intonation
My Gear:
American Deluxe HSS Strat
Crate GT212
Vintage '66 Fender Champ Amp
Dunlop Crybaby 535Q
Jekyll & Hyde Ultimate Overdrive
Vintage '74 MXR Script Phase 90
Vintage '77 MXR Flanger
Orange Squeezer (clone)
#10
Quote by ShutDown785
You just need to tighten the springs in the back of the guitar. Any phillips head screwdriver will work. Just tighten the screws on the 'spring claw' until the bridge is back to where you want it. You could add another spring (or two) to the trem just to further stabilize it.

One problem you will run into by switching from .09 to .11 is going to be a change in intonation. You're going to have to fix the intonation, or else your guitar will never tune (or sound) right. If you don't know how to do that, take it to a shop.

If you're feeling adventurous, there are tons of tutorials on intonation adjustment. It's pretty simple one you realize what you're doing, but it is always time consuming.
Here's a good place to start...
Adjusting Intonation



I totally figured that out right after I typed reply right before your message. You must have been mentally guiding me! ;-). That's exactly what I did. Thanks for all the advice!! I know how to intonate my guitar, I check it every time after changing strings (regardless of changing gauges). Thanks all!
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Classic Ebony with gold hardware
Fender American Stratocaster 3 color sunburst maple fretboard tortoise shell pickguard
Martin 000-M Auditorium
Mesa Boogie F-50
Maxon OD-9
Dunlop 535Q Wah pedal