#1
Okay I'm starting out looking for a project bass guitar. So far I'm thinking a P-bass body (Maybe P-J if i can find it.) But with a J-bass neck. Only problem is that I have no clue what the difference of hard maple vs. birdseye maple for a neck.

The hard maple is averaged about $150 while the birdseye is above the $400 range. If anyone could help me out I would be much appliged.
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For people that are politically correct
#2
well... birdseye maple look better. the tone should be around the same spot. i'm going for birdseye since they look better. i like it. but if you don't really care, maybe u can just go with a regular maple? those are marked like $100ish?
Call me "Shot".

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#4
oh wow thanks for the quick reples.

I'm not really really going for the "Perfect Tone" so I might go with the hard maple. Besides I might sell it anyway to a friend of mine.

Thanks a lot guys for the help.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIII ain’t got no respect!
For people that are politically correct
#5
Birdseye maple is a figured wood, like quilted or flame maple. Nicer looking woods are always higher priced. Birdseye maple is also more difficult to work with, as power tools rip the birdseyes out of the slab.

Both will work, but go with the hard maple, it will still work fine.
Will says:
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Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#6
Quote by FunkRocker321
Birdseye maple is better/lasts longer.

Where do you get such data? Birdseye, like flame and quilt, is an anomaly in the growth of a regular maple tree. It happens when immature buds form under the outer growth rings of the tree. Birdseye maple has the same structural properties as plain hard rock (sugar) maple does.

I have a single "eye" on the fretboard of my Tokai Hardpuncher, so although it usually appears in clusters (meaning you won't find an entire maple tree that has the birdseye figure), single buds can appear.
#7
The "birdseye" is caused by a parasite in the tree and a small percentage of the time it may cause the wood to be less stable. It'll be pretty much identical tone wise, and keep in mind that you can only see the figuring if there's clear finish on it, so if youre going to paint it a solid color, save your money.
#8
^yes. don't paint birdseye maple. it's expensive because u get to look at the grain. tone would be quite similar to hard maple or flamed maple.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


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#9
Quote by OneRust
The "birdseye" is caused by a parasite in the tree and a small percentage of the time it may cause the wood to be less stable. It'll be pretty much identical tone wise, and keep in mind that you can only see the figuring if there's clear finish on it, so if youre going to paint it a solid color, save your money.

That is not true. It was a theory for a while, but it's been dismissed, and in reality noone knows what causes birdseyes to form in maple trees (or in any of the other species of trees in which it can occur). There is an ongoing struggle to figure out what causes it, so arborists will be able to cultivate birdseye maple, making it less of a rare and expensive commodity (something I'm partially opposed to. I don't want it to be seen on everything. It has to radiate a certain amount of exclusivity)
Last edited by Pikka Bird at Sep 2, 2007,
#10
warmoth.com explains Birdseye Maple:
Quote by Warmoth.com
Birdseye is a type of figure found in hard maple. It shows best in flat sawn wood. There is a wide variety of sizes and shapes in the "eyes". Under a gloss finish, the Birdseye takes on a 3D look for a beautiful visual appeal. There seems to be a recurring rumor that Birdseye maple is unstable and not suited to guitar necks. Having made tens of thousands of Birdseye necks, we can assure you that it is no different in stability than plain maple. AAA grade means the wood will be a bit more figured than our standard AA.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


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#11
hey what happened to your new neck fund EC? and did you rememer shipping charges?
#12
^new pickup fund was tehre before. i got enough and i paid for it, so i started a new neck fund an hour ago
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


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#14
^yea... $11/hr 40hrs a week funded me well... too bad its a summer only job. thats the only reason lifeguarding sucks... that and sun-burns. i love sun-burst, but i hate sun-burn.

now i'm jsut a free guitar teacher and a tutor... cheap. unstable hours. i hate it.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


UG's Best DIY PedalBoard