#1
... change my peavey studio pro 50 combo to a head?
heavy support of A7X army pm Copius
Quote by spl3001
I think we can all really agree that nothing is more metal than playing a Telecaster....On fire.

Quote by GiantRaven
The rest of the album is brilliant but that one song just really gets right on my tits for some reason
#2
To physically take off the section of the cab used to house the speaker, or to add a speaker output that can be easily used to drive an external cab?
#3
either one.. i would prefer to make it like the first one.... so that it is just like the head for a cabinet.... because i am going to build my own cab! do you know how to do that?
heavy support of A7X army pm Copius
Quote by spl3001
I think we can all really agree that nothing is more metal than playing a Telecaster....On fire.

Quote by GiantRaven
The rest of the album is brilliant but that one song just really gets right on my tits for some reason
#4
Does the back panel look like the one on this one?

Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#5
yeah but mine is a studio 50 that all.... i can get pics of that would help you guys.
heavy support of A7X army pm Copius
Quote by spl3001
I think we can all really agree that nothing is more metal than playing a Telecaster....On fire.

Quote by GiantRaven
The rest of the album is brilliant but that one song just really gets right on my tits for some reason
#6
you would need to look inside of it and find where exactly the output is, then solder the output wires into a jack which you would need to add to the back of it. sounds a lot easier than it is. as for making it physically into a head, just take a saw to it and cut out the 6 inches below the electronics and take the bottom section and screw it into the left over section. again, easier in writing than practice.
Gear:
Carvin Bolt-T -> Line 6 DL-4 -> Danelectro Fish and Chips -> Homemade Fuzz -> Epiphone Valve Junior Combo -> Amplitube and Guitar Rig.
#7
Quote by franc0ph0bic
you would need to look inside of it and find where exactly the output is, then solder the output wires into a jack which you would need to add to the back of it. sounds a lot easier than it is. as for making it physically into a head, just take a saw to it and cut out the 6 inches below the electronics and take the bottom section and screw it into the left over section. again, easier in writing than practice.


exactly. its actually easy if you can solder and have basic knowledge of wireing. this is a pretty good idea. i'd do it too if i had an old amp laying around.
#8
well the box its in is a slanted box so is there anyway i can like just get the electronics and build a box for it or is that stupid to do. also it is 150 watts so do you think it is worth chopping into and then just either buy a cab or make my own?
heavy support of A7X army pm Copius
Quote by spl3001
I think we can all really agree that nothing is more metal than playing a Telecaster....On fire.

Quote by GiantRaven
The rest of the album is brilliant but that one song just really gets right on my tits for some reason
#9
1st, it's a 50 watt amp, 150 watts is the power the input transformer pulls while in use. Output wattage should be printed on the back plate but I'm not sure, I'm not familiar with that particular amp and can't read the 40 pictured above, it should be a 40 watter. Check the small black and white plate on back, output wattage should be on it.

As for cutting into it, you're not talking about a vintage tube amp worth $1500, if so I would say don't even think about it. I don't like to touch my '73 Super Reverb at all and wouldn't even consider cutting the cabinet up, if I wanted to do this I would build a head type cabinet and keep the original un-messed with. I considered doing this with my '74 Fender Champ, but decided against it, for that reason. For that one it's even simpler, I made up a patch cord to run to an external cabinet, it uses an RCA jack that's easy to reach on the underside of the chassis.

Your amp sells for $100-150 or so used, I would say build a head style cabinet for it if you're up for a tedious woodworking project, go with a shut off jack if you don't mind carrying the whole amp around. It should have 4 screws on top, each corner. Disconnect the speaker wire and remove those 4 screws and it should pull out the back. Some are tight, others just practically fall right out. Get some accurate measurements and build a box to go around it, solder the speaker wire to a jack and drill an extra hole in the backplate of the chassis for it, mount it in the new case the same way it's mounted in the original. Make sure and leave room to mount the reverb unit on bottom if it's presently sitting on bottom of the case, like most Fenders. Some have the reverb unit hung from the bottom of the chassis. That type should be simpler.

If it were me involved in this project, I would install a speaker jack of the type that shuts off the internal speaker and just sit the amp itself on top of an external cabinet. I've done that with a couple of small 10 watt practice amps to get a better sound than the cheesy 8" speaker most come equipped with. That's a 30 minute project, (10 minutes if you didn't have to remove the chassis to get at the PC board), and a lot easier than building a complete case to fit the amp. That slanted cabinet would make it difficult to just cut it off and stick the bottom back on. The shut off jack method would also leave the option of using it in its original cabinet if you want to, for instance if you don't want to haul a lot of equipment around just to jam at a friend's house. Then you don't have to touch a thing, unplug the external cabinet and it's automatically back to the original speaker.

However you do it make sure the speaker cabinet you use matches the resistance of the original speaker, probably 8 ohms.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
so i would still gut the amp then just not cut the cabinet.... right? and it would be so i could switch it back to the oldd cab if i didn't like the way it work on the 4x12... right? if this is what your saying then it sounds cool! i might have to try it! also where would i find a shut off jack.... where could i buy one? i can't find it anywhere!
heavy support of A7X army pm Copius
Quote by spl3001
I think we can all really agree that nothing is more metal than playing a Telecaster....On fire.

Quote by GiantRaven
The rest of the album is brilliant but that one song just really gets right on my tits for some reason
Last edited by SchecterFreak at Sep 4, 2007,
#11
okay so i have another thought... i think it already has a jack output... on the back it says preamp out... and there is a jack.. is that what i need?
heavy support of A7X army pm Copius
Quote by spl3001
I think we can all really agree that nothing is more metal than playing a Telecaster....On fire.

Quote by GiantRaven
The rest of the album is brilliant but that one song just really gets right on my tits for some reason
#12
a preamp out should go to an external power amp which would go to a cab
Gear:
Carvin Bolt-T -> Line 6 DL-4 -> Danelectro Fish and Chips -> Homemade Fuzz -> Epiphone Valve Junior Combo -> Amplitube and Guitar Rig.
#13
No, the preamp out is not the one you need for a speaker. As noted above it is a low power line signal intended for a power amp, and probably to be used as an effects loop. It will send a signal to the speaker that you can barely hear if you put your ear against the cabinet. Power amp in is the opposite, used to preamp another amp through this one, using a similar line signal. Can also be used to plug in a multi-effects unit, using the preamp from the effects unit into the power amp section of the guitar amp. Or as the other half of the effects loop.

Yep, you got the idea. Making a box for a head leaves you the option of putting it back in later if you like, I like the method of just adding a shut off jack, then you have either or. The shut off jack should be available at Radio Shack, it has an extra contact that shorts to the internal speaker when unplugged, and routes the signal to the extension speaker when plugged in. I don't know what the proper term is. It will usually have a blade standing inside the tip terminal arm that shorts to the default (internal) circuit when a jack is not plugged in. Plug in a jack and it breaks that contact and switches to the circuit involving the jack, which would be an external cabinet. I'm not sure I can explain how to wire it, I might have to draw it out and ponder it for a bit. I'm definitely not an electronics whiz...I stared at my practice amp till I figured out which contacts on the PC board to use and traced the wiring both ways until I was pretty sure it would work. I got it backwards the first try, but figured it out before long.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...