#1
I have a guitar with only two knobs and a 3 position lever switch. I want to use both knobs as independent volume knobs for my EMG 81 and 60. I don't care for having a tone knob since I always have it wide open.

I have the wiring schematic from EMG which shows different wiring configurations.
http://www.emginc.com/downloads/wiringdiagrams/EMG-Hseries.pdf

The only diagram with a lever switch is for a 1 volume/ 1 tone configuration. I think I could take the next diagram, which is the "2 Volume (Independent) - 2 Tone - w/ Gibson Style Toggle Switch" and just remove the tone POTs out of the diagram...except it's for a Gibson style toggle switch.

The next diagram confuses me though. It's called "2 Volume (Either volume will act as master w/ selection switch in middle position) - 2 Tone - w/ Gibson Style Toggle Switch". Say your guitar is setup like this and your switch is on the neck pickup with one volume control. Say your bridge pickup's volume POT is set to a lot different volume than the POT for the neck pickup. If you then switch to the middle position, either volume POT is supposed to act as the master, but they are at two totally different positions. WTF?

Which brings up another question...

Say you have the two totally independent volume controls for each pickup and you switch to the middle position. Which POT then controls the volume?
#3
Quote by Will_Minus
http://www.seymourduncan.com/pdfs/support/schematics/3ws_trans.pdf

If the pots are truly independent, then each pot will control the volume of each pot.
To make them independent, switch the hot and output wires.

OK, so I can wire the two volume POTs either way, not wire up any POTs for tone, and wire the switch just like the diagram from your link.

With the totally independent volume POTs, I still don't understand how the two POTs work when the selector switch is on the middle pickup position. Do they both sum the volume in that case? In other words, does one POT at full level give you half the volume and the other POT at full level give you the other half to make full volume?

When either POT can act as the master volume in the middle switch position, How does each POT control the volume? I don't see how either POT can control master volume when they can always be set to two different levels.
#4
No. The neck volume always controls the neck, and the bridge volume always controls the bridge. When the controls are independent you can dial in how much of each pickup you want. You can have '5' of the bridge and '10' of the neck, '7' of the neck and '0' of the bridge, whatever you want.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#5
Quote by Will_Minus
No. The neck volume always controls the neck, and the bridge volume always controls the bridge. When the controls are independent you can dial in how much of each pickup you want. You can have '5' of the bridge and '10' of the neck, '7' of the neck and '0' of the bridge, whatever you want.


Right, I understand they're independent when switched to either the neck or the bridge.

Both POTs/pickups would make part of the total volume on the middle switch position. Say you are switched to the neck pickup and have it's POT on 10. The say if you switch to your bridge pickup, it's POT is also on 10. Now, when you switch to the middle, the POT setting for each pickup would make up exactly half of the total volume. 10/2 + 10/2 = 10

Turn both POTs to 5 and you have 5/2 + 5/2 = 5 average volume.

otherwise it would be twice as loud when you switched to the middle position.
Last edited by dizturbed at Sep 5, 2007,
#6
So wired independently, one POT controls one pickup even when the switch is in the middle.

What about the other setup with the hot wires switched or "2 Volume (Either volume will act as master w/ selection switch in middle position) - 2 Tone - w/ Gibson Style Toggle Switch" That statement seems to contradict itself. How can two different POTs each be the master w/ the switch in the middle position?
#7
Yes. It depends on how they are wired.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#8
How does this look for the "Independent" setup?


Last edited by dizturbed at Sep 8, 2007,
#9
Yes, it is.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#11
Quote by cokeisbetter
Just one thing: it's a pot, not a POT. It's short for potentiometer. Not POTENTIOMETER.

I know what pot stands for. Thanks for the insight, junior.
Last edited by dizturbed at Sep 8, 2007,
#13
also if i want to swap out the duncan designs in my ltd m200 for the passive emg hz h4's i took out of my other guitar how the hell do i wire it to the 3 way slot switch. i understand all these 3 way diagrams but mine has the 8 posts all in a row. so instead of looking like the one above, it looks like this [][][][][][][][]
#14
Quote by dizturbed
I know what pot stands for. Thanks for the insight, junior.

he was referring to your inability to type pot without wanking the caps lock
OMG!!! They're playing One!!!!!11fade to black11one11

God & Founder of UG Electronics


Electronics God of the Laney Cult

My Gear:

Ibanez RG370DX
Laney VC30-212
Dunlop Crybaby
Boss CS-3
Ibanez TS9DX
#17
^ Start your own thread where people will come to answer your question. It's a much more effective method than spamming up someone else's thread.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club