#1
I'm perfectly clear on the wiring difference between Series and Parallel, but what's the difference between say, Series In-Phase and Series Out-of-Phase?
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Quote by Applehead
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#2
Series in phase is basically the sound of the pickups/coils on top of each other, giving a hotter output. Out of phase, the pickups/coils produce an opposite current to each other, which cancels out the common frequencies, giving a thin, low output nasal tone. also if it is a humbucker with the coils out of phase, or 2 reverse wound pickups, it won't be hum cancelling, but if they are not opposite wound, it will.
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#3
In phase is in phase, and out of phase is out of phase. It means the waveforms from the two pickups aren't aligned properly, so all the common frequencies are cancelled out, leaving you with a brittle, thin tone. If you mix up the hot and ground of one pickup, that'll give you out of phase-ness with the other one.
#4
I made a thread asking the same thing a while ago, these are the answers I got
Quote by buzz
out of phase will give the tone a nasal thin quality.almost auto-wah when played hard (as in physically hitting the strings harder).

i dont know from personal experience how series sounds but apparently it gives a much hotter sound.

also "apparently" series and outofphase together at the same time is supposed to be really great sounding.although thats as much as i know.one mans "great sounding" is another mans MG


Quote by forsaknazrael
Series is how humbuckers are normally wired. Parallel is about 30% less output and this results in a brighter sound, a cleaner tone.

With out of phase only do it with neck and bridge pickups. Never wire a humbucker outof phase with itself, and avoid putting pickups close to each other out of phase. The reason being that the closer a pickup is the pickup it's out of phase with, the more of the frequencioes are cancelled out. Therefore, a weaker/thinner sound.
#5
Here's an example of phases working with eachother, and then the phases working against eachother. This is a perfect sine wave, very clean compared to the sound wave of a guitar. You will get the idea, though.

The two waves on the left are from separate sources and are in phase with eachother. The output grows much bigger because they are working together to make the wavelength higher.



The two waves here are out of phase, and therefore working against each other. They are pushing in opposite directions, canceling each other out.



Now two pickups in a guitar will not have identical waves, and therefore you will have variations between the two. The main wavelength is what creates volume, and since the bulk of the waves will be fighting against eachother... you get low volume. The greater the difference between the two sounds, the more output sound you will have. Since no two coils are identical and cannot be in the same physical place on the guitar, you will get some output.
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#6
out of phase = better

atleast for ska, reggae, surf, funk

with a phase switch on a single coil guitar it becomes MUCH more versatile
#7
I was actually looking for something as simple as how you wire pickups in Out of Phase as opposed to In Phase. Great help though...thanks all
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#9
I'd like to propose an idea....say I have two humbuckers on my bass. EACH humbucker is wired to a three-way miniswitch that controls Series/Single Coil/Parallel. That I can do without a problem. But would it be possible to wire in a third switch that controls Out of Phase? What would my options be there? Would that be manageable with a push button? Would both pickups have to be in single coil mode for that to work?
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#11
Can two humbuckers be wired out of phase to each other? Or can out of phase only work with single coils....sorry for being a nublet at this stuff. I ultimately want to be able to wire each humbucker in a different mode (series/parallel), and then be able to wire those out of phase to each other. Would that only take one switch?
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Quote by Applehead
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Sex, pizza, the smell of fresh washing and slap bass.
#12
Yes they can. You need a switch to swap the hot and ground wires for one pickup.
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#13
And swapping the hot and ground on one pickup is all that's needed to get the phased sound? So if I use that SD diagram on one humbucker, that will do the job? Should it matter which pickup gets reversed?
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#14
Most guitars reverse the neck pickup, I believe, but you can do either one. If you can find a wiring diagram from an old Peavey T-60, that makes for a good setup.
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#16
Quote by zeroyon
From Seymour Duncan, again:



Is it possible to get an on/on/on push pull pot so that I could wire my guitar like that. I want to wire my archtop like this but don't want to drill another hole for a switch.
#17
I haven't seen one. Try mouser electronics... they have everything if its available.
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