#1
My Fender Blues Junior (about 1 month old, and a kickass amp, for anyone interested) has been making this odd static noise. It comes and goes when the amp is turned on, whether a guitar is plugged in or not. Today it started making a quiet whining noise which sounded a bit like feedback, but it persisted even when I turned the guitar volume down. I'm new to owning tube amps, is this something I should be worried about, or is it normal?
#2
Try retubing. If it's under warranty still, you should be able to get a new set of tubes free from Fender.
#4
did you buy it in a store like guitar center? because as you all know all of the stuff their is played on all the time so maybe that could be the case? if you bought it their.
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gibson sg specail with grover tuners
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#5
bought it from Hollowood, a smaller store. considerably better than guitar center. But that does make sense- I bought the display model, they didn't have any others in stock.
#6
Static sounds can also come from electronic devices in the room interacting with your pickups, especially tv's and monitors Ive noticed.
"Good and evil lay side by side as electric love penetrates the sky"
#7
true, but I have humbuckers, and the static happens even without the guitar plugged in.
#8
^go trade with a new one. they sold u a bad one. they have to trade you.
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#9
I'd bet you could find out what the problem is and fix it, I already started looking and have an idea how to tell whether it comes from a preamp or power amp tube if it is a tube, which is a good possibility.

However, if it's under warranty you need to get it fixed according to the terms of that warranty. That means anything we advise you to do could legally void the warranty. I prefer not to help someone void their warranty, sorry but that's for your protection and benefit. Contact the store that sold it and deal with it by warranty. It may just be a bad preamp tube right now, but suppose that tube blows an input transformer tomorrow? At $125 and up...That warranty may come in handy, and if it's new it should still have one.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
Quote by the k man22
true, but I have humbuckers, and the static happens even without the guitar plugged in.

do humbuckers eliminate electronic interference? because i get that all the time with single-coil.
_b l/ink youreyes /1 for yes 2 fo_r n o
#11
To start off someone mentioned voiding the warranty, this is definitely a concern! But Tube replacement won't void the warranty. I've had tube amps for over 40 yrs, almost every major brand out there.
90% off all problems with a tube amp will be the tubes, Mesa Boogie will agree with me on that! If the problem still occurs with no guitar plugged in, we have eliminated the guitar as possible suspect, turn the volume off and if the problem goes away then it's probably a preamp tube, I believe there are 3 12ax7 preamp tubes in the JR, but it's my guess it's a power tube. EL84 power tubes are real small and can't take the abuse like a 6L6 or an EL34. Turn the amp volume up to about 6 or 8 and look at the tubes and see if any are glowing, if so most likely you have found the culprit, if not tap each tube with something non conductive, you can hear a bad tube , it will ping, pop, crackle, buzz, or something like that.
If you eliminate tubes as the problem you probably have a short, cold solder joint or intermittent connection due to bad connection. Or a burnt filter cap.
If it goes beyond tubes use your warranty, if your warranty is less than six months old fender will probably replace the tubes free of charge.
Get used to having to diagnose problems, the more you learn the quicker you'll find the problem. And keep a spare on hand, I bring two amps and several tubes to every gig. Carlos Santana can blow a tube in one song!

And yes Humbuckers will cancel the 60 cycle hum usually caused by neon lights or dimmers, but they aren't like noiseless!
Last edited by telecasterred at Sep 5, 2007,
#12
well, I tried tapping the tubes, and they all sounded "normal", i guess, none of them sounded different from the others. If it gets worse, I'll probably take it into the shop, but the problem is that it's not really a constant thing; sometimes it's very noticeable, other times I can't even hear it. I don't want to take it in and have it sound fine and say "well it sounded bad yesterday", or anything like that. Thanks for the advice.
#13
Quote by Paleo Pete
I'd bet you could find out what the problem is and fix it, I already started looking and have an idea how to tell whether it comes from a preamp or power amp tube if it is a tube, which is a good possibility.

However, if it's under warranty you need to get it fixed according to the terms of that warranty. That means anything we advise you to do could legally void the warranty. I prefer not to help someone void their warranty, sorry but that's for your protection and benefit. Contact the store that sold it and deal with it by warranty. It may just be a bad preamp tube right now, but suppose that tube blows an input transformer tomorrow? At $125 and up...That warranty may come in handy, and if it's new it should still have one.

Amps don't have input transformers. And blowing a tube won't affect the transformers your do have in any way- it's only the load on the power transformer that you ordinarily have to worry about, and that's on the other side from the tubes.
#14
OK, it's a power supply transformer, the one that powers the circuit board of the amp. The output transformer is the one at the end of the circuit that drops the voltage and determines the resistance requirement for speakers, and sends the signal to the speakers so I usually call the "other one" the input transformer. I've never been corrected by the builders I know locally. I've also heard them refer to it as the input transformer. The reference is not to the guitar signal input, but the electricity input.

If a tube happens to short it can blow a transformer, either one actually. Anything that shorts or radically changes the voltage or amperage can blow just about anything or everything in the amp.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...