#1
Well I bought an acoustic guitar, used, for like 75 dollars teh other day. I'm sure its not the best, but that is not my concern right now lol. I have been searching this site for the passed few days and have found lots of GREAT info, but I am just overwhelmed with informations right now haha. I really have no clue where to start learning to play! Should I learn on the chords first, and where should I get a list of chords? Should I just start practicing tabs to get my finger dexterity up?

I really like Blues guitar alot, and classic rock too. My fav band right now is prob The Black Keys, I really like their feel. Any help would be much appreciated . -wiggly

EDIT I do already have a tuner, and picks. As well as a set of backup strings. I also know a few easy songs pieces... like a part of Crazy Train, Your Touch, Joker, etc etc. Just a few really easy ones my buddy showed me. I also try to incorporate my ring and pinky finger as much as possible to get them well adjusted.
#2
chords are probably most important. if u want a rly easy chord song, Effect and Cause by the White Stripes is super easy. Wet Sand by RHCP is pretty easy, if u just play the chords and not the extra stuff between it.
#3
Just start by learning all the songs you like. If you have too much difficulty with any particular song, just skip it and wait till you've gotten better by playing other songs.
#4
song books are good if youve got the money to spend on em. i usually cant play but a few out of each one, but thats fine cause theres always another on hand to learn!

try ball and chain by social distortion
#6
Single notes are better to start with, and are easier. Practice chormatic scales (Frets 0-4 each string) and change position.
#7
Thanks for all the responses guys, but I have one more question.

Aren't there chords where you hold certain strings down on certain frets... and strum a set number of strings? Is THAT a chord or is just strumming lowE on fret5 to get A a chord? Also is it important to learn the first kind i stated? Sorry for all the newb questions...
#8
There are really only 5 basic chords you should concentrate on starting out. These are all open chords: G, D, C, A minor, and E. House of the Rising Sun is a great song to learn them because it uses all 5.

As far as your other question, there are chords that feature muted strings (noted as an X on tab sheets). I woulden't worry about those starting out. Learn the 5 basic chords, a few strum patterns, and some basic techniques like palm and finger muting (Bad Moon Rising is a good song to learn finger mutes).

Learn those 5 basic chords and a few scales (i'd suggest minor/major pentatonic and chromatic starting out, then work up to the major scale). Your finger stregenth and dextarity will come in time.
#10
i really don't know the correct way to phrase this, but a major chord sounds happy, and a minor chord sounds sad.
_b l/ink youreyes /1 for yes 2 fo_r n o
#11
Thanks everyone for all the responses so far!!! I'm just gonna go practice some songs, prob house of the rising sun first lol. I'll try to figure out the A Am thing later, I only asked because it came up in a tab, but I'm gonna skip for now haha... thanks again for all the quick responses! -wiggly
#12
A Am
= =
0 0
2 1
2 2
2 2
0 0
x x

the difference is the 3rd tone of the chord is flatted.

in major chords only the 1st, 3rd, 5th tones are played. so even though you are playing 5 notes in the case of the A chord, there's only 3 DIFFERENT notes being played. a chord is more than one note played at once (i know someone will correct me, but thats the most basic answer). if you play that A note on the e-string at the 5th fret, that is simply an A note, not an A chord.

i suggest you do some online reading (cyberfret.com is great) before asking questions. we can all answer questions you have, but youll learn more and learn it quicker by doing the reading yourself.

"knockin' on heavens door" is really easy. its just one measure of g, one measure of d, two measures of am. strum it: 1 2 3 & 4 (down down down up down); and thats one measure.