#1
Hello...
I'm currently using an Apex 435 Diaphragm Condenser mic plugged to a USB Yamaha MW10 mixing board plugged to my PC then to Cubase LE.
I'm completely new to recording, and so don't fully know what the hell i'm doing, but i know the basics of the program. Anyways, my recording in cubase are really quiet for some reason, like, i have my phones plugged into the mixer and i use it for everyday PC use, but when i record something for some reason its super quiet compared to anything else on my computer, even when i have the recording volumes on the mixer full and have the volume in Cubase for that track full.
Sorry if its really hard to follow what i said.
Thanks for any help.
#2
check the volume levels of your computer. it could be the line in volume go to control panel, sounds and audio devices then click the first advanced button, this will bring up your computers volume levels, turn everything up full and see if that solves it, then you can go back and adjust it however you want.
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#4
^ also a very valid point
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#5
i heard that some condenser mics need a preamp cause they dont output much or something like that...
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#6
Thanks for replies.

The volume on the comp is all full, and my amp is playing loud. I put the mic right in front of the amp when recording.
And if this makes any difference, the mic is phantom powered, but the mixing board takes care of that.
#7
First things first......how are you jacking into the computer? If Im following right, you are USB into the computer correct? If so, trim the input on the mixing board as high as it can go first of all(til the point where the light starts flashing on the board telling you that your signal from your instrument is too hot).

If you have any way to adjust the input signal into your computer, trim it as high as you can as well until your clipping in the program. Than roll it back just enough to keep it from clipping.

All the important stuff goes on within the mix though........no matter how hot your signal is, it WILL be quieter until a little mastering is applied.

So first things first, within your mixing program, look for a NORMALIZE function. This will bring the track volume all the way up to unity(so, if your input signal was a little low.....this boost it to unity prior to any volume controls). Next step is limiting/compression. See if your program has any sort of limiting or compression plugins. This is what really brings up your signal strenght(it basically trims the peaks and brings up the low frequencies and smashes it all together.....you can then drive the track volume even harder before clipping).

If you are new to these effects.....you will have much more luck with some sort of hard limiting. Mastering compression takes a good bit of practice to get used to. Hard limiting in most of the computer based programs is usually much more forgiving. You can squeeze out the additional volume you need without dramatically changing the sound of the track. However, your first few attempts at compressing in the program will be tought! The track will sound "bouncy", or sound like its pumping for lack of a better explanation until you really get a feel for all the parameters.

Small changes make big differences! And in terms of the "feel" of the track, once you hear the compression working or the limiting, youve probably already added too much. What your really striving for is an equal balance between all frequencies so that everything sounds loud and clear, steady, and powerful........but you dont want to bring in that pumping element.

This is why any studio recorded music on your computer sounds louder........levels are hot as can be and then the mastering compression, limiting gives you even more headroom to boost output without clipping(going over unity). So, the perceived track volume(what you hear) is higher.
#8
You said the mixer has phantom power, is it switched on?
I don't know if it needs to be, I have no experiences with phantom power, but it seems like it could be a problem...
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#9
If you're looking for a quick boost in volume in Cubase LE, before exporting the track as mp3 (or whatever format you're using), open up the Mixer window (can't remember where it is), and chuck the master volume up to full, i think it's the one on the left of the panel. Next, you can click on VST Outputs (in the same place as the mixer, i think it's the second last tab on the top of the program) and put that fully up as well. It's possible that some gain may be generated, simply lower the levels until you have appropriate volume without unnecessary distortion. You can easily achieve the same volume as other mp3's and such music doing this.
#10
Yeh, the PP is switched on.
I'll try what you said Greg, thanks alot.

Thanks for all the replies so far
#11
Im not too familiar with Cubase, but computer recording in general has been one of my hobbies for a real long while now, so if you got any questions, Id be glad to help as best I can.
To hear what can be done with a pretty bare bones computer home studio, minimal cash and lots of time.....visit http://myspace.com/redlightcrisis I play the guitar on the tracks and take care of recording duties.