#1
I've known removing the back plate on a Strat(the part which gets you to the springs and trem) can give the guitar better tone. Right now i have my trem locked and have 5 springs in. But now the question is should i remove the plate? ive tried it a few times and like the sound but am worried about bumping the back wrong and messing up stuff inside. is it worth it?
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#2
I have two guitars with strat trems and one with a floyd and I don't have a cover plate on any of them. Don't worry you won't hurt anything.

My big question is, where did you hear that removing the plate will give you a better tone?

I've been playing for quite some time and even worked in a guitar shop and I must confess I've never heard that.

If that were to be true, how would it improve the tone?
#3
well it first started when i something got in the plate, so i removed it and it sound both better acousticly and the tone held better. it wasn't a ridiculous change. but it did sound a little better
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#4
That's cool. I hope I didn't come off sounding condecending, if so I'm sorry.
The main reason alot of people take, or leave them, off is for ease of string change.
#5
Take it off, the only bad things that will happen are A) dust will get inside easier, and B) the ground wire could get ripped.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#6
Quote by Kill Rockstar
That's cool. I hope I didn't come off sounding condecending, if so I'm sorry.
The main reason alot of people take, or leave them, off is for ease of string change.



nah its fine, its just to me it sounded better idk. but im gonna mess around with it
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#10
This seems one of those high level BS storys to me. To be true there must be a theory to explain why such a change would affect tone and/or such a change must be clearly established, either by measurements or through double blind tests. If nothing is measured and no one can hear the difference except those who KNOW whether the guitar has a backplate or not, the effect is not there.
Fitting extra strings however, will pull the bridgeplate firmly against the body and does improve sustain, acoustic volume and tuning stability. That is both covered by theory and established through experiment. You won't be able to bend upwarts any more though.
#11
If a piece of plastic screwed to the body could interfere with resonance, wouldn't the scratch plate be more of a problem? I suppose it'd be a problem if it buzzed.

Now here's a theory. The more of the bridge in hard contact with the body the better for sustain right? That's why a hardtail or string through will sustain better than a floating bridge. With me so far? If you blocked off your trem with something pretty resonant, like a lump of the same Alder the guitar's made of, then jammed a steel backplate up against it, wouldn't that actually improve the sustain?
Quote by The devil at the crossroads
E|-------------------------------------------1--
B|-----------------------------------1--4--
G|-------------------------1-3-4--
D|------------------1-3----
A|--------1-2-3----
E|-1-4-----

Just move it around the fretboard
#12
Clogging up the trem by jamming pieces of wood between the 'beard' of the bridge assembly and the body is a common and well proven way to improve tone and sustain. That's how the hardtailing of vintage strat trems is usually done.
Adding a steel plate seems a bit redundant to me. Sound waves don't propagate well through bounderies between different density materials, so it probably won't do anything audible.
#13
Quote by Marcel Veltman
Clogging up the trem by jamming pieces of wood between the 'beard' of the bridge assembly and the body is a common and well proven way to improve tone and sustain. That's how the hardtailing of vintage strat trems is usually done.
Adding a steel plate seems a bit redundant to me. Sound waves don't propagate well through bounderies between different density materials, so it probably won't do anything audible.


Really? I always thought that big shelving bracket looking bridge on my telecaster would be really good for sustain. Doesn't transfer vibration well between the bridge on the body?
Quote by The devil at the crossroads
E|-------------------------------------------1--
B|-----------------------------------1--4--
G|-------------------------1-3-4--
D|------------------1-3----
A|--------1-2-3----
E|-1-4-----

Just move it around the fretboard
#14
Quote by Cosimo_Zaretti
Really? I always thought that big shelving bracket looking bridge on my telecaster would be really good for sustain. Doesn't transfer vibration well between the bridge on the body?


Good question which I can't readily answer. From other fields of engineering I know that boundaries between layers of different density materials reflect rather than propegate sound waves. I also know that screws going through such different layers help to transfer sound waves from one side of the barrier to the other. Another thing is the contact area. A larger contact area transfers more sound. (explaining the better performance of your tele bridge as well as that of a hardtailed vintage trem)
These are all very plausible reasons why a steel bridgeplate actually does work. Bottom line will probably be that a steel bridge doesn't offer a perfect solution, but merely the best solution for this particular engineering problem. In other words; it's crap, but as long as nobody comes up with anything better we'll have to live with it.