#1
In the song Bat Country by Avenged Sevenfold during the bridge they have a chord progression: Dmin, Cadd9, E7, Amin Add 9, Fmaj9{(no 3rd) at least that's what all guitar chords says}

Song is in D harmonic minor

Can someone tell me why it sounds so good. It's like all the pieces fitting in a puzzle when playing the chords one after another.
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#2
Dm : D F A
Cadd9 : C E G D
E7 : E G# B D
Am(add9) : A C E B
Fmaj9(no 3) : F C E G

So you've got the D as a pedal note through the first 3 chords, and the way the D sounds changes as its relationship to the chord it's being played over changes. Then there's an E pedal note through the 2nd - 5th chords. In the last 2 chords, the C and E stay in place while the A moves down a third to the F, and the B moves a third down to the G.

The way the chords are related could make the progression sound good.
#3
nice analysis, blue_strat.

a few add'l notes:

* I heard a G chord in between the Dm and Cadd9 (Gadd9 to be specific). So those three chords in the beginning maybe make you think you're going into a circular progression (where F would be the next chord)...

* ... but instead you hear E7, which as blue_strat says, sounds esp nice cuz the D which has been in the previous three chords is still there. Also the E7 sets you up for the next chord (Am), because it's acting as a secondary dominant to Am (E7 is the V of Am)

* in between the Am(add9) and Fmaj9 there's a G in the bass, so you could say there's a Am(add9)/G in between the Am and Fmaj9 chords. And that's a nice (and common) progression, Am - G - F