#3
I cant explain it. Google it.
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#4
there are two types of harmonic; pinched and artificial, pinched harmonics are picked and sortof... stroked in the same motion usually with the thumb holding the pick.
artificial harmonics are made by putting your finger over the fret wire on some frets (3, 5, 7 and 12 are good ones) and then plucking the string as normal.

hope that clarifies...
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#7
a harmonic is a note where u barely touch the string and it makes a chimey or bell-like sound. EX=hold ur finger lightly over the 12th fret and strum. it should sound like the notes on the twelfth fret, but chimey. U can also do harmonics from either side of the fretboard as wel, either on the normal side u strum on or on the left side of ur finger.
#8
Can you link to the tab?
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#9
Quote by danielrobbyshor
there are two types of harmonic; pinched and artificial, pinched harmonics are picked and sortof... stroked in the same motion usually with the thumb holding the pick.
artificial harmonics are made by putting your finger over the fret wire on some frets (3, 5, 7 and 12 are good ones) and then plucking the string as normal.

hope that clarifies...


I thought Artificial and Pinch harmonics were the same... I very well may be wrong, though. There are natural harmonics, pinch harmonics and tapped harmonics.

Natural harmonics are where you lightly touch the string above the fret, and pinched harmonic are where you have your picking thumb touch the string immediately after you pick the string. Natural harmonics are generally quite easy to do, depending on the fret/string, it can very. Pinch harmonics are generally known as the harder type of harmonic to learn how to do. Just read up on them, or have friend teach you.
#10
I also thought artificial and pinch harmonics were the same, though i could be wrong, since ive only just learnt them lol

I thought I'd just share a really good video I found on how to do the pinch harmonics with everyone

clicky

for a good example of their use, I recommend listening to Coheed and Cambria - Welcome home
#11
I've also picked up a different harmonic style from Van Wilks, the first and only person I've seen do it. I'm not good at it yet, but working on it.

Fretting the note you want in the normal manner to play that note, find the octave or harmonic you want and touch it there lightly with the index finger of the picking hand, same as a normal harmonic and pick it holding the pick between thumb and middle finger, or with the thumb itself and no pick.

I think I've heard Eric Johnson do the same thing but not positive, it wouldn't surprise me though since Van and Eric are good friends and have played and recorded together a number of times. Eric plays on "Vanatized" from Van's Koko's Hideaway CD, and that song by itself makes buying Koko's Hideaway well worth it. Van is a blues and rock style player, and one of Texas' finest.

It's difficult to do because you have much less space between string and fret, and of course because it's a new technique you're not familiar with. The lack of space between string and fret means it's very easy to buzz or muffle the note on the frets instead of a nice clean harmonic. But it can be used to get a harmonic out of almost any note, and some interesting chords, with the notes picked individually as harmonics. I'm not sure if any are present on any of the soundclips on his webpage but the song "Without A Word" on Koko's Hideaway uses that type of harmonic in the intro. I can't listen to it right now to check and see, the soundclip is in real audio format and I'm running Linux and not sure if this thing will play them. I'm also on dial up and it would be a few minutes before I could hear it anyway...

Van also uses a couple of other innovative harmonics, one by picking the note then lightly touching the string at the harmonic location to change it to a harmonic, and one by using a slide bar after the harmonic to slide it down or up or just vibrato. The octave works best for the first method, I stumbled on the second technique myself years before I ever heard of Van Wilks, now one of my favorite guitar players, and thought I'd created my very own lick...Van is the only other person I've ever seen or heard use a slide that way. I just wondered if it would work and grabbed my Zippo lighter, which I used as a slide bar until I found out they actually made them, and tried it on a whim. It worked great, even on an acoustic. 10 years later or so when I saw Van do the same thing onstage I just about fainted...I KNOW he didn't get that idea from me, we had never met before. The slide technique is used on "Stilletto Blues" from the Texas Jukin' CD. It should also be on the video on the front page.
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Last edited by Paleo Pete at Sep 6, 2007,
#12
Quote by danielrobbyshor
there are two types of harmonic; pinched and artificial,


they are the excact same thing.

Pinch harmonic (artificial harmonic) can be acheived by:
1. hold the pick so only a small amount of the end comes out
2. when picking the note go at it on a slight angle as though you are swooping in at it, when picking your thumb should slighlty hit the note making a 'squeling' sound. this is a pinch harmonic. when doing them there are 3 spots which you can do them. one if near the neck pup and the others close to the bridge pup. there are videos on youtube which give lessons in harmonics.

Be sure to use lots of gain to ge the most out of them

Natural harmonics are acheived when your finger is only slightly touching the string, this can be achieved on various points on the fret board.

hope this helped a bit.
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Last edited by xblack_sabbathx at Sep 9, 2007,
#13
To do a harmonic, all you have to do is LIGHTLY put a finger on the 5th fret of any string. Then pluck the string. The result is a harmonic. There is another kind of harmonic call a pinch harmonic. The trick is to get the string between your pick and your thumb, then down pick it. It works better if you use the ball of your thumb. It's sounds wicked if you vibrato it.
#14
Quote by Alienguitar
To do a harmonic, all you have to do is LIGHTLY put a finger on the 5th fret of any string..


This is correct but there are more places...eg 7th fret, 12 fret 19th fret...the list goes on
Quote by Shea Donoghue


Then, about two minutes later of just plowing, I can feel it coming. She's still moaning and rolling back, and then I pull out. I grab her by her hair, pull her head up, and yell out:
"BOOM, HEADSHOT!"
#15
i use my index fingernail on my pick hand for pinch harmonics
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#16
If you want to know what a harmonic ACTUALLY is, in physical terms as opposed to just the guitar definition....understanding what's actually happening means you know WHY harmonics work and you'll better understand how to use them
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic
Actually called Mark!

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#17
Interesting thing about artificial harmonics is that the pitch actually gets higher as you go down the fretboard. Play one on the 12th fret, then the 7th, then the 5th, etc. The pitch will get higher.

Seagull, that's an interesting page. Lots of info there .
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#18
In principle an artificial harmonic is exactly the same as a natural one - all you're doing is damping the string at a node to cancel out some of the other harmonics...if you measure the distance from the nut to the 5th fret, then hit a pinch harmonic on the open string the same distance from the bridge ( it'll be around where the neck joins the body)you'll get the same harmonic.

That's also why pinches are tricky to hit - when you fret the string you change the length of the bit that can vibrate so all the harmonic nodes move.
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#19
Quote by xblack_sabbathx
This is correct but there are more places...eg 7th fret, 12 fret 19th fret...the list goes on


Yes, you are correct.

With enough practice, he would have realized that The application of harmonics is a different story. Best way to learn that is by listening to players who do use harmonics. Examples are a.k.a 'the man' - Joe Satriani and Steve Vai. Even some blues and jazz players use harmonics.
#20
Google and wikipedia can be very good sources my friend.
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