#1
So I practice Rock Discipline whenever I can, but I also like to practice songs, so my question is, what percent of my practicing should be on songs? Like say i have two hours to practice, how long should I work on Rock Discipline and how long on songs?
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#2
ive noticed that i got to a point last year where doing exercises just wasnt cutting it, i was losing a lot of interest, and not growing as fast as i had been, so then i started attacking some malmsteen, its all about where you feel you are, if you want to focus more on songs, because you feel you can grow more from them, or if you wanna focus on exercises because you feel you can grow more, go ahead
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#3
I'm not a fan of exercises, musical instruments are ment to make music, and we should never spend any of our time practicing something that is not musical. As far as I'm concerned there is only one reason to use exercises, and thats to warm up. So my recommendation is to find pieces of music with the desired technique and to use that piece of music to work on that exercise.
#4
heres the thing. yes practice and excerise is important. but it will not help if it gets to the point where it becomes more of a chore. music is about fun man! remember that.
#5
Quote by Erc
I'm not a fan of exercises, musical instruments are ment to make music, and we should never spend any of our time practicing something that is not musical. As far as I'm concerned there is only one reason to use exercises, and thats to warm up. So my recommendation is to find pieces of music with the desired technique and to use that piece of music to work on that exercise.


Exercises help you play the music you like. Every song you hear uses particular techniques eg alternate picking, hammer ons, bends etc If you practice these, the next time you come across a song that uses them, it will be a lot more easy to play for you.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#7
Quote by radiantmoon
Exercises help you play the music you like. Every song you hear uses particular techniques eg alternate picking, hammer ons, bends etc If you practice these, the next time you come across a song that uses them, it will be a lot more easy to play for you.


+1
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#8
Hi bsoates,

The best way to create "exercises" is by tackling the music you want to play, and then creating exercises out of the parts you cannot play. That way you'll kill two birds with one stone.

Mike Philippov
#9
I don't think anyone can tell you how much you should be practicing songs vs
doing exercises. It's up to where you want to go with playing. In either case,
it's MUCH more important in HOW you go about practicing either one. Practice
is a time where you need to be fully present amd aware of what you're doing.
If you're just running through some exercises without paying attention and/or
undertanding why you're doing them, might as well not bother.

The benefit of exercises is that you can focus, like a laser, on one or a couple
of things and really give it your full attention. You can't go wrong by noting what
your weaknesses are and doing a lot of specific exercises for that. I'd go so far
as to say, it's pretty much a requirement that you regulalry do this sort of thing
in your practice if you want to access higher levels of playing. If you want to
"just make music" that's ok too, but you should realize that just won't cut the
mustard for more demanding types of music.
#10
Quote by bsoates
So I practice Rock Discipline whenever I can, but I also like to practice songs, so my question is, what percent of my practicing should be on songs? Like say i have two hours to practice, how long should I work on Rock Discipline and how long on songs?



It's all about balance. There are lots of right answers to this. You could do an hour of each. You could do 2 hours, and switch every other day. You have to find what works best in your schedule.
#11
I tend to start off doing exercises, then drift into playing songs or improvising. I have no discipline. But I think 50/50 is the way to go. You need to practice technique to be able to play what you want, but you need to play songs because it's fun, and it's the reason you actually picked up the guitar in the first place.
#12
Quote by radiantmoon
Exercises help you play the music you like. Every song you hear uses particular techniques eg alternate picking, hammer ons, bends etc If you practice these, the next time you come across a song that uses them, it will be a lot more easy to play for you.

Ya, or you could NOT have lame "exercise" sessions, actually GET said song you'd come across, and have the fun learning it while you play. "exercises" and "practices" and all that technical poopy make ME wanna quit music, so if you wanna be Steve Vai and practice "exercises" for 10 hours a day, kudos to you
#14
I'm not a fan of exercises, musical instruments are ment to make music, and we should never spend any of our time practicing something that is not musical. As far as I'm concerned there is only one reason to use exercises, and thats to warm up. So my recommendation is to find pieces of music with the desired technique and to use that piece of music to work on that exercise.


Ditto.

I always HATED playing scales on sax in high school. I'd rather take a beating than practice scales...I practice songs I want to learn, improvise, pick up the acoustic and work on finger picking, I've been leaning more and more toward finger picking electric lately too. I take a break every half hour or so, and I never go over the same song more than 3 or 4 times. Move to something else, come back to it later. If you get bored or tired with it, you won't make any progress. And don't bother "cramming" the night before a gig, anything you do will be useless. Our band director never played our concert songs at all the day before a performance. If we didn't have it already, we just didn't have it.

Practice what you feel works for you, nobody can answer this question for you, there are too many right answers. Find what works for you.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#16
Quote by radiantmoon
Exercises help you play the music you like. Every song you hear uses particular techniques eg alternate picking, hammer ons, bends etc If you practice these, the next time you come across a song that uses them, it will be a lot more easy to play for you.



this is just boring. i tried doing some speed mechanics exercises and they put me to sleep.

if i want to practice alternate picking, i will pick a song that has a lot of alternate picking. then the song - or parts of the song - becomes the exercise.
#17
Play what you love to play. Thats the key not always working on getting your chops up. Instead find the songs and music you love to play, make songs up, improv, it'll make you better overall. you can have the best technical chops in the world but if they can't be put to music whats the point?
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#18
Whatever you enjoy, you will improve with, as long as you do it properly. I happen to prefer the regime of going over something like a sweep arpeggio over and over, and ****ing around with positions and stuff like that, making my own exercises up but also ones that are melodic, not just mindless wankery over and over. Practicing scales especially is very helpful when it comes to writing your own leads and whatnot too, so it has it's advantages

That's not to say I've never learnt a song or whatever, but whatever helps you maintains your enthusiasm is the best way to improve your playing.
#19
It's kind of funny. Some people seem to be awful proud of the fact that they find
exercises boring. I don't know why. They don't have any boring/not boring
intrinsic nature, it's all how you choose to view them.

I happen to really enjoy doing them. But mostly all I do is improvised stuff so I
directly use just about everything I work on as an "exercise" when I play. It
wasn't until I got more serious about doing exercises (as opposed to just
learning songs), that I got a lot more knowledgable about what I was doing,
better at seeing the fretboard and able to do a lot more things with my fingers.
All while just making it up on the spot!
#20
Sweeping for example, is something I find more beneficial to do the exercises, THEN move onto the examples like Malmsteen, Becker etc to practice them and see how they fit in, trying to play some of those that virtuosos write while you are still learning is just going to drive you nuts, better starting smaller and building it up
#21
Quote by pos69sum
this is just boring. i tried doing some speed mechanics exercises and they put me to sleep.

if i want to practice alternate picking, i will pick a song that has a lot of alternate picking. then the song - or parts of the song - becomes the exercise.


good then your still practicing the techniques you need to. I find exercises that have a distinct purpose utilize the full range of motion though. Sure chromatics are boring but they are good for all four fingers and alternate picking. A lot of songs dont utilize the full range of motion.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.