#1
I've been playing acoustic guitar for about a year and I know natural harmonics, the basics of tapping, bending, vibrato? (bending back and forth fast). I need some help with these things though:

Sweep picking: all I know is that I should go about like I'm gonna do a chord (with my right hand) but then just do it slower while I hit individual notes with my left hand...actualyl i don't think that's right? I really know nothing about this.

Pinch harmonics: I've got the basics down. I can do this on the lower four strings (won't try it on the top two because I'll probably break them) but only if I'm lucky. I usually do it by fingerpicking a single string with my thumb and middle fingernail. Any tips on making it easier/less effort?

tremolo: I think this is that effect where you use three (four?) fingers to really quickly hit 1 string. It seems easy I just want to know if I'm getting it right.
#2
if you play with a goddamn pick it'll make all that stuff you want to learn easier.
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#3
Quote by bite_the_bullet
if you play with a goddamn pick it'll make all that stuff you want to learn easier.


How bloody rude!

*Reported*
#4
Quote by BravoSector
I've been playing acoustic guitar for about a year and I know natural harmonics, the basics of tapping, bending, vibrato? (bending back and forth fast). I need some help with these things though:

Sweep picking: all I know is that I should go about like I'm gonna do a chord (with my right hand) but then just do it slower while I hit individual notes with my left hand...actualyl i don't think that's right? I really know nothing about this.

Pinch harmonics: I've got the basics down. I can do this on the lower four strings (won't try it on the top two because I'll probably break them) but only if I'm lucky. I usually do it by fingerpicking a single string with my thumb and middle fingernail. Any tips on making it easier/less effort?

tremolo: I think this is that effect where you use three (four?) fingers to really quickly hit 1 string. It seems easy I just want to know if I'm getting it right.


Sweep picking is a laymans term for performing an arpeggio, or to arpeggiate chords, which is pretty much what you think it is. Rather than strum fast to make the whole chord sound out at once, each string is picked one after the other in succession, producing individual notes of the chord. A very popular song with this in it is House of the Rising Sun, by the Animals.

Pinch harmonics are easiest when using a pick. You just need to hold the pick correctly. Instead of holding it so that your thumb and forefinger are at the widest part of the pick, choke down on it so that just a small part of the pick is showing out between your fingers. Then as you pick a string, try to have the meat part of your thumb brush against the string right after the pick goes past it. The skin contact will have the effect of muting out a part of the vibration of the string, producing the harmonic as the result.

Tremolo is nothing more than bending the string, but very fast and very short movements, to acheive that fast wavering sound. I think what you are referring to is hammer-ons and pull-offs, which are completely different than tremolo. Another term for tremolo is vibrato.

Hope this helps.
#5
sweep picking is really fast tho, not just simple arpeggios. its strumming, but moving your fingers fast so that when u strum, it sounds like ur playing five or six notes really fast. And ur definition of tremolo is pretty much doing fast hammer-ons. that requires alot of finger strength. And u rly should use a pick except when u do fingerpicking. i wouldnt strum using ur fingers. u could hurt urself. i kno i have.
#6
^I was not referring to speed in regards to sweep picking. Just defining it. My definitition of tremolo is not the same as performing hammer ons. Tremolo/vibrato is "a warming of the tone caused by moving the pitch periodically above and below the true pitch in an imperceptible manner". Think of it as very small bends back and forth on the string by the fretting finger, and is usually done rapidly, and without changing frets. You can also tremolo pick, which is very fast picking of a single string back and forth. These effects are similar, and some music dictionary's list them differently, while others state they are the same. Hammer-ons are "A note sounded literally by "hammering" down with a left hand finger, often performed in conjunction with a note first plucked by the right hand on the same string."
And strumming using your fingers is how it all started! Perhaps you should learn a bit more before posting.
Last edited by LeftyDave at Sep 6, 2007,
#7
Quote by qotsa1998
sweep picking is really fast tho, not just simple arpeggios. its strumming, but moving your fingers fast so that when u strum, it sounds like ur playing five or six notes really fast.

There is no required speed for sweep picking, you may do it at any speed you wish as long as you achieve the proper sound.

Quote by qotsa1998
And ur definition of tremolo is pretty much doing fast hammer-ons. that requires alot of finger strength. And u rly should use a pick except when u do fingerpicking. i wouldnt strum using ur fingers. u could hurt urself. i kno i have.

I didn't read anything in dave's post that said tremolo/vibrato were hammer ons and pull offs.

And i've never heard of anyone hurting themselves strumming with their fingers. I actually hear a lot of people talking about strumming with their fingers. Unless you meant something else.
epic7734
#9
I get what you're onto now. Tremolo/vibrato can be performed with either the right or left hand. What you saw in that vid is a form of tremolo picking via fingerpicking, not to be confused with the style of vibrato performed with the fret hand. Sorry if you got confused. I too have to remember that some effects can be achieved with either hand, with different results, but are called the same thing. I guess this is why the english language is such a pain sometimes. Italian and latin has it pretty cut and dried as they use different terms for those.