#1
i have been over this several times, and while im no theory expert, i do know my stuff to an extent.

a chord progression i came up with goes A C#(Db)m G Bm

i put the Db in parenthesis because depending on the key, it can go either way.

help?
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#2
If it was in A, the G would be G#dim, so you could call it A mixolydian (D major).
#3
The chord would be C# minor, and it sounds like your tonic is A. You get a bit outside with the G, but having a major chord on the minor seventh note relative to the tonic isn't uncommon in rock/pop music.

edit: blue_strat: it isn't entirely in the major or mixolydian: it's a mix. The C#m contains a G#
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#4
yea i figured it would be an accidental with at least one of them. of course i just wasnt sure. A seems about right, but it feels like it resolves to the Bm, so would that mean that it could be in a key fo B? or is that just one way of determining it that doesnt apply to this situation?
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Highway One Telecaster
Dean Evo
Mesa F-50
Laney GH50L
Vox AC30 C2
Ampeg V2
pedals
#5
Well, when I hear it, I feel like I want to go to A from the Bm. The G to B minor change is not a particularly strong one; they share two tones (the B and the D) and there no leading tone going to the B (which for B, would be A#).
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out