#1
hey guys, just wondering, has anyone tried the roland cube 30 bass amp? if so, would u recommend it?
besides should this be in another thread or something? tell me if it should be.
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#2
i tried it the other week in my local guitar shop. i would reccomend it becasue it has loads ov effects an different amps on it. an for a 30 watt its realli loud.
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#3
Roland make great practice amps for those who just want to practice in a bedroom, college dorm, flat/bedsit etc. I wouldn't like to gig with any of their bigger amps, though.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#4
The Roland line of cubes and micro cubes are good practice amps and are ideal "small gig with acoustic guitars" amps. For their relative size, weight and wattage they deliver a decent punch.

If you are looking for a good portable amp for practice and the occasional backyard jam, the Roland Microcube or the Pignose H30 are both really nice battery powered amps that handle bass surprisingly well.
#5
I tried the smaller bass cube at my local guitar store for quite a while, and it is a lot of fun as a bedroom/practice amp because it's insanely easy to use and has just what you need for bass: dedicated compression, a diversity of amp models and some super simple but fun effects. That said, I think most of the effects sound cheesy and there's no way around it because you can't really tweak them at all. Obviously this isn't a huge deal since you aren't going to gig with or even jam with this thing and no one else is ever going to hear it. I say get one, switching and trying effects instantly with no hastle on this decent sounding little amp gives you a good idea of how you want to play a song. I would think it would be a great bass-line writing amp.
#6
I am currently using a Roland Cube 15 guitar amp (out of necessity) and I am impressed at how well it performs as a practice amp for bass. Obviously, it's not designed for this and lacks low end projection, but it has a decent tone and good response. If this is any indication, the bass version would make a nice practice amp. However, if you are serious about playing bass, I would recommend saving up for something more specialized.

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#7
Quote by Armored Artist
However, if you are serious about playing bass, I would recommend saving up for something more specialized.


I'm not sure what that means. "Serious"? If you're serious about playing bass, you'll want to know how to pick the appropriate tool for the job. If this person is going to be playing in a bedroom or college dorm, no good him having a 300w half stack.

If I wanted an amp for sitting and jamming to a CD or acoustic guitarist with, or taking on a trip with me... or even a coffee shop type acoustic gig, I'd probably take the Cube over my big, bulky, loud Laney rig. If I had one, of course.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#8
^ By serious I mean serious enough to want a more refined tone in a year's time. I never said anything about wattage or half-stacks. It just so happens that the better-sounding amps also tend to be louder and have larger speakers. A 60W, 15" speaker combo makes a good balance between quality of sound and home use sensibility.

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#9
Roland has really good quality amps. I've played a few, but I wouldn't buy one. Their price tags are pretty high IMO, but you do get quality that's for sure.
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#11
Quote by Armored Artist
^ By serious I mean serious enough to want a more refined tone in a year's time. I never said anything about wattage or half-stacks. It just so happens that the better-sounding amps also tend to be louder and have larger speakers. A 60W, 15" speaker combo makes a good balance between quality of sound and home use sensibility.


Well, obviously a bigger amp is going to sound better. But that's not the point I was arguing. The point is, for someone tight on space, or money, or who will not be staying in one place all that long, a whopping great 15" combo might just take up too much room compared to a compact Roland that you can slip beneath a bed or into a cupboard. Regardless of the wattage, 1x15 combo's tend to be big and heavy.

I know if I had to leave where I'm living now and spend an indefinate amount of time in bedsit accomodation, I wouldn't bank on getting space for a 1x15 combo, which tend to be both wider, taller and deeper and much heavier than your typical little practice combo. And I find when you're into the 1x15 range of combo's, useful practice features like headphone outputs disappear and get replaced with 1/4" or XLR line out features aimed at live practice / small gig use rather than home practice. I'd put my big amp into storage somewhere and take a Roland or similar compact amp. As for "more refined tone", as the cube is a modelling amp you don't get much scope to create a unique tone, but damn, is it convenient. And most people who buy practice amps buy them for their convenience. It's really the main reason why they exist.

Of course, if the guy is looking for something that will handle full electric band practice et cetera, he'd do better going your route. But that's a given. I'm just stating the pro-Roland case.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#13
Quote by bass dude nick
are roland and ampeg owned by the same company because their logos are really similar


I believe not, Ampeg are American owned, though Ampeg has outsourced all it's production to Asia, where Roland is based, so I wouldn't be shocked if the same factories make both companies' amps So much for Ampeg superiority.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#14
in music, you get what you pay for. Roland is a Major player. they cost more, but are worth it! the Cube series bass amps are worth it, until you can afford an Ampeg.
outsourced or not, Ampeg is bass.
#15
ive got a cube 30 theyve got great tone and has enough effects for anyone. the only thing is you need a good cable because otherwise theres quite a lot of crackling.
#16
Quote by 83lespaulstudio
in music, you get what you pay for. Roland is a Major player. they cost more, but are worth it! the Cube series bass amps are worth it, until you can afford an Ampeg.
outsourced or not, Ampeg IS bass.

Fixed.
#18
Hmm not really, i use one in my school and tends to peak quite early (when turned up quite loud starts to distort and sound quality is lost) but for a practice amp it is fine.
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#19
the Roland Cube series are nice "practice" amps, but for gigging, your gonna need more power. i believe 200watts is a good starting point for gig amps.