#1
I saw this router for $54.99 (reg. 99.99) in a Canadian Tire ad.

Here are the specs:

10A motor with electronic variable speed: 11,000 - 28,000 rpm.
1/4" collet.
Micro-fine depth adjustment ring for precise routing

It's a Mastercraft if that helps...

Just thinking of getting one for guitar work, is it any good?

EDIT: this is it: http://www.canadiantire.ca/browse/product_detail.jsp?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=1408474396672872&PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524443294669&bmUID=1189202875871&assortment=primary&fromSearch=true
Last edited by wylde_overdrive at Sep 7, 2007,
#2
Should work fine for a few guitars, but if you want to do many guitars i'd invest in a tool rather than just buying one...
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#3
Quote by AlGeeEater
Should work fine for a few guitars, but if you want to do many guitars i'd invest in a tool rather than just buying one...


What do you mean? Like invest in a better router?

Will this think break or something?
#4
Mastercraft are mostly crap. Get something better, even a DeWalt or something.

Basically with Mastercraft, you get what you pay for. There's a reason it's cheap
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#5
Quote by wylde_overdrive
What do you mean? Like invest in a better router?

Will this think break or something?

I dont think it will break, but after using it (especially to learn on, you beat the hell out of a router learning on it) for a while the motor and parts will decrease in performance.

Invest in a good(usually expensive) tool, or just buy the cheapest tool you can find. The difference between the two? How long the tool will last, perform as it should and be reliable.
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#6
When you say getting one for guitar work do you mean just routing pickup and control cavities? or are you talking about cutting and shaping bodies?
Depending on what you'll be doing will determine what type of router you'll need.
#7
Well AlGee, I certainly trust your judgment then. What brand would you recommend?

Oh I've already used routers, I just don't have access to them any more.

Quote by Kill Rockstar
When you say getting one for guitar work do you mean just routing pickup and control cavities? or are you talking about cutting and shaping bodies?
Depending on what you'll be doing will determine what type of router you'll need.


Thing's I would use it for:

Bridge routing
Pickup cavity routing

Things I wouldn't do:

Anything that isn't the above two.
#8
You can use one router to do everything. Cleaning up the sides of a rough cut body, pickup cavities, electronics cavities, neck pockets, neck tapering, even neck shaping.

Personally i've got a DeWalt router, I believe the model number is DW618. It's a 2-1/4 HP fixed based router. Really, really nice but really, really expensive. I bought mine for around $200 a few years ago but they're probably a lot cheaper now. I find myself using it in a router table more than anything though. If you're going to be doing a lot of handworking with the router i'd get something with a little less power. A DW616 might be a better choice.
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#9
Quote by AlGeeEater
You can use one router to do everything. Cleaning up the sides of a rough cut body, pickup cavities, electronics cavities, neck pockets, neck tapering, even neck shaping.

Personally i've got a DeWalt router, I believe the model number is DW618. It's a 2-1/4 HP fixed based router. Really, really nice but really, really expensive. I bought mine for around $200 a few years ago but they're probably a lot cheaper now. I find myself using it in a router table more than anything though. If you're going to be doing a lot of handworking with the router i'd get something with a little less power. A DW616 might be a better choice.


Would trem routing/pickup cavity routing be considered handworking?
#10
Mastercraft has a superb warranty. If something goes wrong, you just take it back. The router you listed will be more than adequate. The bits you invest in are important, however. Go to Lee Valley for those (2100 Oxford St. E. in London BTW). You can spend a lot on a router and accessories. I just spent almost $2000 last week on a new 1/2" 3.25hp router and a JessEm table with all the attachments, but I have work on a new house and some custom furniture and cabinets to do as well as the occasional guitar work.
Last edited by Vulcan at Sep 7, 2007,
#11
Quote by Vulcan
Mastercraft has a superb warranty. If something goes wrong, you just take it back. The router you listed will be more than adequate. The bits you invest in are important, however. Go to Lee Valley for those (2100 Oxford St. E. in London BTW). You can spend a lot on a router and accessories. I just spent almost $2000 last week on a new 1/2" 3.25hp router and a JessEm table with all the attachments, but I have work on a new house and some custom furniture and cabinets to do as well as the occasional guitar work.


Well, I guess I'll try the Mastercraft, and if it's a P.O.S. I'll just take it back and save for one of the DeWalt's that AlGee listed.
#12
I have a mastercraft or duralast or something of that nature. I picked it up at Farm and Fleet for about $30. A guitar is not heavy duty work, I doubt I'll ever need more. Most cuts that will be made are only a few inches by a few inches, so I doubt you'll ever need to actually spend alot of money on one of those fancy ones.
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Quote by ratmblink123
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#13
Quote by CORT noob
I have a mastercraft or duralast or something of that nature. I picked it up at Farm and Fleet for about $30. A guitar is not heavy duty work, I doubt I'll ever need more. Most cuts that will be made are only a few inches by a few inches, so I doubt you'll ever need to actually spend alot of money on one of those fancy ones.


I only really plan on using this two or three times in the near future. The heaviest work I plan on doing is routing 2 guitars that already have strat bridges for Floyd Rose bridges. I'm pretty sure all that's involved in that is a 1/2" route on the top of the body.
#15
Quote by wylde_overdrive
I only really plan on using this two or three times in the near future. The heaviest work I plan on doing is routing 2 guitars that already have strat bridges for Floyd Rose bridges. I'm pretty sure all that's involved in that is a 1/2" route on the top of the body.

Exactly. And, if you get it from Farm and Fleet they give you a 2 year warranty. My dad buys those drills from them because his drills burn out every time he tries to carriage bolt the supports on a deck. He buys the 15 dollar drill, and returns it once per job.
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Quote by ratmblink123
Good for you. Have a cookie.


But really... there's no cookie. And if there was, you wouldn't get one.
#16
Quote by CORT noob
Exactly. And, if you get it from Farm and Fleet they give you a 2 year warranty. My dad buys those drills from them because his drills burn out every time he tries to carriage bolt the supports on a deck. He buys the 15 dollar drill, and returns it once per job.


Even I think that's wasteful

Also, Farm and Fleet isn't in Canada... or even most of the United States...
#17
Quote by wylde_overdrive
Even I think that's wasteful

You gotta do what you gotta do. He used to buy $400 dollar drills, then burn them out every job. Now he just buys a $400 drill for everything else, and the Tool shop/ Mastercraft/Duralast drills for the Carriage bolts.


^ And really? No Farm and Barn? I got it lucky :
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Quote by ratmblink123
Good for you. Have a cookie.


But really... there's no cookie. And if there was, you wouldn't get one.
#18
i would suggest a craftsman uh there's a model out a couple of years ago execelent i'll try to get the model of it
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#19
Quote by new2castle
i would suggest a craftsman uh there's a model out a couple of years ago execelent i'll try to get the model of it


Cool, I totally forgot about craftsman!
#20
Quote by new2castle
i would suggest a craftsman uh there's a model out a couple of years ago execelent i'll try to get the model of it

I wouldn't reccomend the Craftsmen routers. Just check out the Sears website the routers have horrible reviews from buyers.

I did alot of research before I bought my router. I contacted alot of custom builders and the overwhelming majority used Porter-Cable.
I now use a 1 3/4 hp Porter-Cable that's dedicated to my router table for shaping bodies. I use a small laminate trim router that I found at Harbor Freight for $20.00 for all the cavities.
#21
Quote by Kill Rockstar
I wouldn't reccomend the Craftsmen routers. Just check out the Sears website the routers have horrible reviews from buyers.

I did alot of research before I bought my router. I contacted alot of custom builders and the overwhelming majority used Porter-Cable.
I now use a 1 3/4 hp Porter-Cable that's dedicated to my router table for shaping bodies. I use a small laminate trim router that I found at Harbor Freight for $20.00 for all the cavities.


So you're saying that a router like the one I linked to would be good for just cavities?

Remember guys, I DO NOT do body shaping.
#22
I couldn't see it the link only took me to a home page of some sort.

The reason I use the small laminate trim router is because I clear alot of the cavity away with forstner bits in the drill press and clean it up with the router. Plus it's alot smaller and easier to handle.
The most important thing is using quality bits. I use bosch bits. I also have a set from Grizzly that I use for shaping bodies.
#23
Whoa, you can do cavities with the laminate trimmer? I've been looking at those and assumed it couldn't be done.

Does the laminate trimmer hold a normal router bit? Or are you limited to 1/8" collet bits?
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#24
Quote by zeroyon
Whoa, you can do cavities with the laminate trimmer? I've been looking at those and assumed it couldn't be done.

Does the laminate trimmer hold a normal router bit? Or are you limited to 1/8" collet bits?



I assumed the same until a custom builder I know told me that's what he uses.

Now I can keep my Porter-Cable dedicated to my router table. It works great, but remember I said I use forstner bits to remove a majority of the cavity then use the small router to clean it up. Otherwise it would be too much for the router. It may sound like extra work, but I had all the tools needed anyway, so it works out great for me.

Here is the laminate router that I use.
#25
I love that. 2.5lbs? Must be handy to work with.

I did my first humbucker route with a drill, basically applying the same method you described. I drilled with a 1/2" bit in to route depth repeatedly to tear out the bulk of the wood. I then used a 1/4" and progressively smaller bits to clean out the rest. This method sucks, and I don't plan to do it again. However, it did work just fine. I broke one bit and scratched through the masking tape into the body right near the neck pocket. (sharpie mark hid it!)

I said I'd buy a router for the next go-round. It's just that it seems like lugging the heavy router over the top of the finished body seems ludicrous to me. Even with masking tape, it sounds risky to the finish.

Not to mention, the higher cost of a decent router.
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#26
sorry about hijacking the thread but...

what would you guys say about getting a dremel and a router table attachment? I was thinking about this becuase of the versatility of it with a roary sander and such... aslo the one I was looking at had a rebuildable motor to extend the motor life by 5 times they said which is the only thing I was really worried about.

any input?
#27
the dremel has like 1/8" dept and is not good for heavy duty work ...
maybe you can do binding channels or small detail work.
as well as taking about a month in each cavity taking like a milimeter per pass XD
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#28
I used a Dremel to route a truss rod channel and channels for carbon stiffeners on a bass neck a few years ago. It did a nice, accurate job, but I burned out the bit in that one job, and it took a very long time. As has been mentioned, you must do many, many passes, each of which takes off only a millimetre at a time or less. If that is all you have, it's acceptable, but if you don't absolutely need to use one, a proper router is far better.
#30
I've used that one before, and they're heavy and uncomfortable. I'm telling you, go with the DeWalt. They're seriously the lightess, most compact and most powerful router in the price range. Best bang for your buck and stuff.
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#33
Quote by wylde_overdrive
I might as well just save for this: http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/tool_detail.asp?productID=5585

Good?

Yup if you feel that you need the plunge ability.
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#34
Quote by AlGeeEater
Yup if you feel that you need the plunge ability.


To route guitars for things like a floyd rose or any bridge for that matter, wouldn't I need the plunge ability?
#35
Not necessarily, if you've got a drill press anyways. I was just figuring that you did, but if you don't than get the plunge for sure.
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#36
Quote by AlGeeEater
Not necessarily, if you've got a drill press anyways. I was just figuring that you did, but if you don't than get the plunge for sure.


No drill press here