#1
I'm really sorry for the caps but I'm extremely worried right now

I have encountered a problem today when I replaced my strings on my electric 6 string guitar. I use DR Dimebag Signiture strings.
The strings I had on before were Gauges 10,13,17,30,44,52 and they were fine.
I replaced the strings with the exact same kind, except one down, 9,11,16,28,38,50.
The problem is that when I play the E or A string there is horrible vibration between the string and frets.
The problem was lower tension so in the same tuning the strings will vibrate a lot more and what I was hearing was fret buzz.
I put the old strings back on the guitar, and now it sounds almost just as bad!
What could be wrong? I'm really worrying right now.
I've noticed that recently the sound of my guitar has been a bit fuzzy, like it did with the new strings except not as bad.
Do you think I just need a brand new set of strings of the gauge I used before the change? Because I have not changed them in a long time, probaly 4 months for that set.

I'm really worried right now, when I play 12th fret is sounds terrible. I won't be able to sleep until I find out what is wrong. Even when I tune the knobs up to increase tension I can still hear it. Everything was pretty much perfect before I changed strings
Last edited by noturningback at Sep 8, 2007,
#2
Please please please help me!
I cannot do anything until I find out what is wrong!
I feel like kicking a whole in the wall and throwing the computer through the window.
#4
I'm sorry for the poor spelling, I usually have good spelling, punctuation and grammar but right now I'm extremely worried.
Getting it set up at a music shop really would be a last resort, I really want to know what is wrong. Thankyou so much, I'm really stressing right now.
#5
I'd never ever do this normally but I'm still really really stressing and need help, any help at all.
I know not to double post but I need to bump the thread, I'm really sorry but I'm just stressing so much.
#7
just get it set-up, I think that the neck is bowed or stretched because of the change in strings gauge
A hero of war, Yeah that's what I'll be

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#8
I probaly will take it to the music shop, I can get it serviced for free because I bought it less than 12 months ago. It's just my parents will get really pissed off because they bought it for me, it was about 9 months ago.
If I know what the problem is I'll be able to explain to them and it will put me at rest a bit.
#9
Used to happen to me too. You got a Les Paul type guitar? If you take off all the strings at once, it can screw with the action.

For the future, replace your strings one at a time(or two/three if you're daring). That solved the problem for me.

-EDIT- That's after you've got the action sorted, that is. Sorry for the kinda useless post, but it'll help you in the future.
#10
Ok, so I kind of explained to my mum.
I have an SG kind of guitar, An LTD viper to be exact.
If It's an action problem I'll sleep easy tonight, If it's a bowed neck I'll be worrying.
I took all the strings off at once then did them one by one.
Could you confirm that it's probaly an action problem, just for my piece of mind?
#11
yes...yes i could.


now sleep, but sleep with one eye open! RIPPING YOUR PILLOW TIGHT..

EXIT LIGHT!!
ENTER NIGHT!!
TAKE MY HAND!!
WE'RE OFF TO NEVER NEVER LAND!!!

(solo)
#13
check your action, and your trus rod, and make sure the strings suit the kind of guitar you have, its not a big deal....
Quote by Raziel2p
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Lol
#14
It's a big deal for me because guitar is what keeps me breathing.
Playing the 15th fret is almost completely buzz.
#16
The truss rod doesn't fix action problems. The truss rod keeps the neck slightly concave, a balance that can be ruined if strings are changed in too rapid sucession, causing the tension to fluctuate unnecessarily. Don't adjust the truss rod unless you've eliminated all other possible problems because if you adjust the truss rod and the truss rod isn't the problem, you're just going to make things a whole lot worse.

A lot of things happen when you change your strings. The tension on the neck goes all over the place which means when you change your strings you will likely also have to change the action and intonation (the latter being not relevant in this case). Adjust the action a bit and see if that solves your problem. If it doesn't, and only if it doesn't, check to see if the neck is either too concave or convex (there are a lot of ways to do this that are specific to your guitar, most require a capo -- do a google search). If you've determined that that's the problem, adjust the truss rod slightly (a quarter turn is almost always enough), either counterclockwise if you've determined that the problem is an overbow (causing the action to become unnecessarily high), or clockwise if the problem is an underbow (causing the action to become unnecessarily low).

EDIT: There's nothing wrong at all with changing all of your strings at once, just a) be prepared to adjust your action and intonation when you do (which you have to do anyway when you change any amount of strings) and b) do so -- especially on 3-3 tuning head configurations (Les Paul) -- always starting in the middle and going outwards (for both taking them off and putting them on), ie G-D-B-A-e-E.
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Last edited by Me2NiK at Sep 8, 2007,
#18
alot of times when you change string guage you need to get it setup

((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((()
#19
Don't bother paying someone to set it up when you can easily do it yourself! It's not a complicated procedure.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
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#20
Yeah man, if you changed to a higher gauge it could possibly the higher tension pulled the neck forward, which can be adjusted by turning the truss rod. It sounds that you may want to go into a shop and have them look at it. If you think you can do it by yourself, try adjusting the action first though, just to be sure, but if that doesnt help I think you may have a bow in the neck. Good luck man.
#21
Quote by Me2NiK

EDIT: There's nothing wrong at all with changing all of your strings at once, just a) be prepared to adjust your action and intonation when you do (which you have to do anyway when you change any amount of strings) and b) do so -- especially on 3-3 tuning head configurations (Les Paul) -- always starting in the middle and going outwards (for both taking them off and putting them on), ie G-D-B-A-e-E.


No-one said there was anything wrong with it, but if you don't want to go through all that, change them one at a time. It makes things a lot more hassle free.
#22
Quote by The devil at the crossroads
E|-------------------------------------------1--
B|-----------------------------------1--4--
G|-------------------------1-3-4--
D|------------------1-3----
A|--------1-2-3----
E|-1-4-----

Just move it around the fretboard
#23
Quote by Steve The Plank
No-one said there was anything wrong with it, but if you don't want to go through all that, change them one at a time. It makes things a lot more hassle free.

Meh, personally I think it'd be more work to change them seperately considering doing so would require you to intonate and adjust the action on each string each time.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
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#24
Quote by Me2NiK
Meh, personally I think it'd be more work to change them seperately considering doing so would require you to intonate and adjust the action on each string each time.


No, doing that a string per time means you DON'T need to do that. Keeping strings on there whilst you changes them allows the pressure on the saddle to be reasonably the same, whereas if you remove all strings it totally messes with it (or at least, it does for me). Sorry, it's kinda hard to explain :S

I think my guitar's just ****ed up. :/
#25
Thanks for all the replies, its put me more at ease.
I didn't actually change to a higher gauge, I changed to a lower one.
I'm going to go and get it fixed at the guitar shop, I'd rather not do it myself because I'm only 16 and I can get it done free because they have some deal that you can get it serviced for free once within 12 months of buying it.
Once again, thanks.