#1
Well i have a cheap epi lp junior, which i bought for abuse/experimenting on. i think a good way to get into modding would be a simple mod like a tone bypass on a 1-pickup guitar.. this guitar is surprisingly comfortable and actually sounds pretty good considering its apparently made of plywood (i'm not sure of this however), but i find myself fighting with the tone control when trying to mellow out the sound (to be quite honest, i hate tone controls and would be happier with a switch.)

anyway, just to clarify, will this diagram work?



i know this will involve cutting into the wood, but since i plan on adding series/split/parallel switching at some point anyway, this would be good for practice.

also - i already have the SPDT switch - i happen to have one lying around. though i'm likely to replace it with a push/pull tone bypass later, i can't spend any money at the moment, so this would be a good test imo.

EDIT: oops, in my rush i forgot to add the capacitor to the diagram, but you get the idea.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#2
My goodness, no. Get rid of the ground on the bottom terminal of the switch. The way you have that, you'll either have the tone control, or kill the signal. You don't need anything connected to the bottom terminal.

If you don't want to drill holes, you can use push-pull pots. You can't so series/split/parallel, but you can do series/split -or- series/parallel
Meadows
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#3
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
My goodness, no. Get rid of the ground on the bottom terminal of the switch. The way you have that, you'll either have the tone control, or kill the signal. You don't need anything connected to the bottom terminal.

If you don't want to drill holes, you can use push-pull pots. You can't so series/split/parallel, but you can do series/split -or- series/parallel

heh yeah the ground i wasn't sure about. the dilemma about drilling holes is more down to what i plan to do later on after more practice - i'm going to drill a hole for a mini toggle anyway at some point.

so other than the switch ground mistake, its fine? (bearing in mind i forgot to draw the tone pot cap)
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#4
Bypassing the tone control won't mellow your sound, it will brighten it up.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#5
Quote by Will_Minus
Bypassing the tone control won't mellow your sound, it will brighten it up.

yeah, thats what i want to do. basically, i want a controllable tone, so i can mellow the sound with the tone pot, and simply flick a switch to bring it back to full. it would work better than having to twist it back to the same value when i want to get the warm sound again.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#6
Oh, I see.

You could just replace the tone control with a switch to switch between mellow and bright.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#7
just a tought - if i placed a capacitor between the mistake on the diagram (i.e. between the bottom lug of the switch and the un-needed switch ground) would this then bypass the tone control and cut the highs?
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
Last edited by Blompcube at Sep 9, 2007,
#8
Yes it would but way too much! A capacitor is basically a very low impedance for AC signals like audio. You'll need a series resistance with it to prevent killing all your high frequencies. See pic attached.
Two ways to do this would be
1. Change the value of the cap located on your tone control from 0.02ufd (probable value) to something else (more ufd's equals brighter sound and vice versa)
2. LP pots are usually 250Kohms, so add a series resistor of that value to the fixed Tone CCT as shown. You can experiment with different values here too!

Good Luck.
Attachments:
CCT.jpg
#9
thanks KenG, but i'm not sure if this guitar has 500k pots or 250k (haven't checked yet), usually humbuckers have 500k?

i think for now i'll just add the tone bypass, since i have the switch lying around but none of the other parts, also i'd prefer to use the simple bypass system with a switch.

I later plan on replacing this switch with a 3-way mini-toggle, to do series/split/parallel, and having a push/pull tone pot for tone bypass (with a push/pull, i'd prefer to have a warm tone in the bypassed position, because i tend to turn the knob by accident with them) and a phase reverse on one of the coils on the humbucker, which means i'll need to buy push/pull pots, on/on/on DPDT switch, capacitors and resistors and a new pickup... which i can't afford right now
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#10
No problem. You may be right on the value for humbuckers. To be honest I can't remmeber off the top of my head whether it's 250K or 500K. I just remember one's for single coil and the other for humbuckers. I also misled you on cap values with my earlier statement. The formula for calculating XC (reactance of capacitance) is: XC=1divided by (2xPIxC (in farads)x Frequency (in Hz). Therefore I should've indicated a smaller value of ufd (microfarads) for more highs.
#11
Quote by KenG
No problem. You may be right on the value for humbuckers. To be honest I can't remmeber off the top of my head whether it's 250K or 500K. I just remember one's for single coil and the other for humbuckers. I also misled you on cap values with my earlier statement. The formula for calculating XC (reactance of capacitance) is: XC=1divided by (2xPIxC (in farads)x Frequency (in Hz). Therefore I should've indicated a smaller value of ufd (microfarads) for more highs.

The formula is right, but I figured i'd add this in

The smaller value of "hmmm never mind this box won't accept the char....." but it's the greek symble for Mew which is kinda like a U with a line in front that goes down like a P, and Just F, may help you search for the cap if you know this.


XC=1/(2PiCF) ....wow no greek symbles are allowed in, you would think they would be for the major using in electrical feild... Also the XC should be measured in Ohms... which is the greek symble omega, "horsehoe"
#12
well i'm not sure when but i'm gonna just do the simple bypass soon, until i can buy the other parts i need for the other stuff. I might just keep it as a simple bypass when i've added other mods.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.