#1
Hey all,

I've got a squire strat here that I want to keep upgrading. It's still got the stock tuning pegs and bridge assembly.... which would help it stay in tune better? The pegs or bridge or even both? I was just going to grab a bridge from ebay from a guitar like a John Mayer strat or something... any recommendations are welcome!
-Red 1990 Fender Strat with maple neck
-Cream colored Strat. GFS Premium II pickups.
-Line6 spider 210 and Fender Pinceton Chorus amps
-Zoom G2
#2
Check out guitarfetish for a bridge and pegs. But genuine strat brindge holes probably will not line up with the holes on your squire exactly so you may have to do a little sanding to get the holes to line up but it shouldnt be too bad. as for which one to replace I dont know.
#3
Why do you want to replace it, out of curiosity? That's just about the only thing I left the same on my Squier rebuild. I don't see why you'd replace it; it's perfectly fine. Try just replacing the saddles with these: http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Bridges,_tailpieces/Electric_guitar_tremolo_parts/Graph_Tech_Strat_Style_Saddles.html
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#4
Is the bridge set up to be floating? Do you still have the stock nut?
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#5
I still have the stock nut and it's not a floating bridge either.

I wanted to replace them because the guitar doesn't stay in tune like my MIA strat so I figured it was poor quality tuning pegs or something... but if they don't really matter then maybe I should just save myself the trouble?
-Red 1990 Fender Strat with maple neck
-Cream colored Strat. GFS Premium II pickups.
-Line6 spider 210 and Fender Pinceton Chorus amps
-Zoom G2
#6
A new nut will help.

Have you been stretching your strings, and giving them a few wraps around the tuning post?
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#7
Quote by Will_Minus
A new nut will help.

Have you been stretching your strings, and giving them a few wraps around the tuning post?


Didn't think of the nut...

I have been stretching them and I give them three wraps around the post.
-Red 1990 Fender Strat with maple neck
-Cream colored Strat. GFS Premium II pickups.
-Line6 spider 210 and Fender Pinceton Chorus amps
-Zoom G2
#8
Try sanding a #2 pencil to a thin, flat pint and scraping some graphite into the nut slots before re-stringing. It makes a big difference.

The strings dig into the nut slots and get in a bind, when you bend strings or use the tremolo the strings don't come back to their original position, you're out of tune. Graphite nuts tend to work better, but I stiill use a pencil on my Peavey Patriot, it still had slight intonation problems. Graphite in the nut helps a lot, but might not completely eliminate tuning problems.

The only way I know of to completely stop intonation problems on a strat is to go with a locking nut and tremolo like a Floyd Rose. The pencil trick will make a big difference, try it before deciding to shell out a lot of bucks for new parts.

Also if you can find one, the Hipshot Tremsetter makes a lot of difference too, it's a double spring setup that replaces the middle spring and gives it a positive stop, and still alows tremolo movement in both directions. I think mine cost around $30 10-12 years ago. Between the two, my Squier Strat does pretty well. I've seen another one advertised, made a bit different, but can't remember what it's called and don't know if it works at all.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#9
^The only thing in that post that might actually help is shaving some graphite in the nut slots. Everything else will be pointless and a waste of money.

Your bridge is fine. You don't have it set to float, so there shouldn't be any tuning issues caused by the bridge. I would say that the major areas of concern are at the headstock, namely the nut, string retainer and tuning machine. The nut issue has already been addressed (graphite). The string retainer should not hold your strings at an extreme angle. You will want to back off the retainer so the angle of the E and B strings match that of the A and D strings. That's the most tension you need. Also, a little petroleum jelly mixed with some graphite dust will do wonders under the string retainer.

The stock tuners on most Squier guitars leave a lot to be desired. If you should happen to have the cash, and upgrade to some Sperzel locking tuners will do a lot for you tuning stability.
#10
I'd upgrade the tuners if it's economical for you, the tuners on most squiers (affinities anyway) are the main reason I've never bought one. They don't have a nice action or ratio on them, so when I pick up one in a shop I dislike it as soon as I start to tune. They've lost me as a customer before I've even played a note.
Quote by The devil at the crossroads
E|-------------------------------------------1--
B|-----------------------------------1--4--
G|-------------------------1-3-4--
D|------------------1-3----
A|--------1-2-3----
E|-1-4-----

Just move it around the fretboard
#11
I use schaller m6 locking tuners and i swear by them. The graphite suggestions above are also excellent. I do not recomment the floyd as extensive modification is required and string changing is a hassle. If you get a floyd either you must recess it into the body or shim the neck. Something that is much more work than enlarging tuner holes for the schallers. I also hear good things about the planet waves, although I am too brand loyal to switch from schaller. For dive bombs, screams, etc. a regular tremolo works well... I don't have tuning issues anyway.
#12
awesome last four posts you guys! I've never heard the graphite in the nut before so I'll do that for sure... can't beat free and effective can you.

If that doesn't fix up the problem I might try the tuners themselves like Cosimo said but wil leave the bridge alone based on what I've read from you all here.
-Red 1990 Fender Strat with maple neck
-Cream colored Strat. GFS Premium II pickups.
-Line6 spider 210 and Fender Pinceton Chorus amps
-Zoom G2
#13
Quote by ErosThanatos
I use schaller m6 locking tuners and i swear by them. The graphite suggestions above are also excellent. I do not recomment the floyd as extensive modification is required and string changing is a hassle. If you get a floyd either you must recess it into the body or shim the neck. Something that is much more work than enlarging tuner holes for the schallers. I also hear good things about the planet waves, although I am too brand loyal to switch from schaller. For dive bombs, screams, etc. a regular tremolo works well... I don't have tuning issues anyway.


Oh yes, the regular tremolo works great. I use a '60's reissue strat with the original vintage style tuners...my bridge never touches the surface of the guitar. For some strat users, it's blasphemy to hear of someone locking the bridge down to the body. I do it the way Leo intended and keep it tuned so a full pull-up on the bar lets me raise the pitch about 1 1/2 steps.
#14
Thank god 2string you are one of the only people out there with me that don't like "Fraud Roses" on strats. I don't like it period.... but that's another matter entirely.
#15
Quote by TwoString
Oh yes, the regular tremolo works great. I use a '60's reissue strat with the original vintage style tuners...my bridge never touches the surface of the guitar. For some strat users, it's blasphemy to hear of someone locking the bridge down to the body. I do it the way Leo intended and keep it tuned so a full pull-up on the bar lets me raise the pitch about 1 1/2 steps.

1.5? I need to see how your gutiar is set-up...I can only do about 1/2 a step...