#1
I there anything we should know before we start recording.

And what kinds of stuff do we need to record demos?

Do we need a huge area to start recording demos?
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#3
how much money is it for recording a demo at a studio?
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#4
yea, brian apocolypse summed it up. practice like theres no tomorrow and go to a local studio, i have the recording workshop, and john schwabb studios withing 30 mins of me so just look for a good studio.
#5
^Well a studio would be expensive

Plus if your band has no recording experience then it will take much longer, and that will result in more costs.

My band is getting the Tascam DP-01 8 Track Recorder and a Mixer for Recording

We already have 58 Mic For Vocals and were getting a 57 Mic for Guitars

The 8 Track Recorder can only record up to 2 tracks at once (this serves as a problem when you're recording drums as recording drums with only 2 mics will sound like garbage)
however thats when the mixer comes into play

(the mixer can record up to 8 tracks at once)

were going to borrow 8 drum mics from my friend's dad's band

hook them all up to the mixer, and mic each drum
then when we've mixed the drums you can take all 8 drum tracks and put them onto the 8 track recorder but make them into only 2 (stereo and mono) instead of 8

The Recorder also has a cd burner built in with a 40gb hard drive and a mastering function.

You Might want to look into to doing that
I'll give an idea of what it will cost

Tascam DP-01 I think $399.99 at zZsounds
You can get a mixer anywhere from $100 and up
And I'm not sure the prices on the mics but probably around $100

If you can do this the benefits of it as opposed to going in a studio are:

Once you get all the equipment, you wont need to pay anything more for it, so if you want to make a couple of demos over the next couple of years it wont cost anything after the first time, plus you can take as long as you want.
Last edited by tom-the-lawn at Sep 8, 2007,
#6
A decent studio would be a fair bit, but you could quite easily get something like $40/hour / $200 a whole day at a less prestigious and smaller institution.

Provided the engineers were good and your band VERY tight, you could be recorded and mixed within four hours.

I'm very much an amateur, but I can easily record 3 songs with tight band and competant subordinates in about an hour, 45. Any producer that calls himself (or herself if you're the kind of person who cares about that stuff) a profession should be able to beat that.

Best bet is to search for local studios, they can almost always give you a quote over the phone, or over the internet, of course.

The guy above; having no experience isn't a hindrance, the staff will tell you what to do, and help you focus on just the performance. Plus of course, if you're serious, you'll be grateful for the studio experience later on, so it's a good learning curve.
Last edited by BrianApocalypse at Sep 8, 2007,
#7
^ It's more then someone telling you what to do

you need practice recording songs

If you can record 3 songs in 45 minutes then you are extremely ****ing good.
#8
Quote by tom-the-lawn
The 8 Track Recorder can only record up to 2 tracks at once (this serves as a problem when you're recording drums as recording drums with only 2 mics will sound like garbage)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiFOD1EeKhQ >>> check this out, best video you’ll ever see (after the berries and cream lad!)

The Recorder also has a cd burner built in with a 40gb hard drive and a mastering function.


In my experience, these “mastering functions” aren’t particularly good. You’d get a much better result by having a decent engineer mix and master manually with proper studio hardware, not a garage band quality studio-in-a-box.

If you can do this the benefits of it as opposed to going in a studio are:

Once you get all the equipment, you wont need to pay anything more for it, so if you want to make a couple of demos over the next couple of years it wont cost anything after the first time, plus you can take as long as you want.


Although once you’ve paid for it, it’s yours to keep, the cost of an entire set up (bear in mind things like mikes and cables, plus the fact not everyone has a relative or friend to borrow off of) is going to be much higher than a day trip to a real studio will be. On top of this, there could be dispute over who owns each piece of kit you went splits on if the band splits up (selling it and splitting the cash is not a fun activity, nor is it a good use of time) whereas the masters would be owned 25% or whatever depending on how many lads and lasses are in the band.

On top of this, it will take an extremely long time to get good at using the hardware, and being in a garage isn’t as fun as being in a studio, which might affect the band’s performance, especially if you have to layer more and use less inputs.

With the mixer trick, if you set a single fader wrong, the damage will be done, and you’ll have to start over. With a multi track box you can’t fix it in the mix, which is very important for an inexperienced band.
#9
Quote by tom-the-lawn
^ It's more then someone telling you what to do


you need practice recording songs

A slight generalisation, I broke in a bunch of kids (sound dirty, no?) a few months ago, and they did as well as veterans (except that their songs were crap). I tend to father bands though, a more laid back hippy type of guy would probably let first timers do their own thing and hell would break loose.

I see what you mean though.

If you can record 3 songs in 45 minutes then you are extremely ****ing good.


Sorry, that was a typo. it wasn't between an hour and 45 minutes, it was an hour and 45 minutes, i.e. 105 minutes. That does include setting up and doing the levels though. My record is 115, but I was working with a complete tool for an engineer who miced the instruments wrong, didn't follow the wall box mike input plan and didn't use keyboard shortcuts.

I'm a reasonably good producer, because I'm decisive, capture the feeling and get things done as quickly as possible. I'm a mediocre engineer, but I can control the studio floor like the pope controlled medieval europe.
#11
Bare minimum, you could probably get away with buying 4 mics , a mixer and/or usb interface, a pre-amp(assuming you mixer doesn't have phantom power) and some recording software(ie Reaper). You'll need 2 condensor mics for drum overheads, a mic on the snare and a mic on the kick. If you choose wisely when buying mics for drums, you should be able use them for the guitar, bass and vocals as well. As far as the cost of buying vs the cost of renting a studio, used gear off of ebay evens the odds quite a bit on that comparison. $200 spent for a day in the studio could get you a used mixer and a couple used mics. Since you guys sound like you have no idea what you're doing yet, a studio rental would be a colossal waste of money imo. Theres a good chance the average local studio rent-a-tech isn't going to give a rats ass what your recording ends up sounding like. Either way, you need to do alot of reading before you're ready to get an even slightly usable sound out of your recordings. There are several books out there for beginning home recording(ie Guerrilla Home Recording) and several forums(ie homerecording.com) that you should check out before you do anything.
#12
Honestly doing it yourself doesn't seem to make sense here, unless by demo you mean just a reference track for your band to be able to review, but if you are serious about a demo that you want to use to promote yourselves doing it yourself with no experience doesn't make sense.

Okay studio's may get a little bit pricey, but in the long run its the experience you get by doing it, you get to go in there focusing on music and not focusing as much on anything related to the technical side. Also as someone pointed out, its a whole different vibe going into a studio as going into a garage, theres a lot more excitement and feeling going on.

In terms of the timing in a studio though, setup time and finding tones will take you a lot longer than everything else. Just make sure you are well rehearsed so that you can be more efficient in your recording time.

It's up to you, but you can not compare going into a studio with buying a bunch of equipment that you don't know how to use to record at home. Its not logical.