#1
Hello,

I currently am using a Jackson RR3 Rhoads with a Floyd Rose Licensed Tremolo. I switched to Gauge .10's just to check em' out. Because of this, I had to tighten the springs in the back. This caused the tremolo to be incredibly hard to push on. I switched back to .9's, my favored gauge, and loosened the springs back. But it is still hard to push on the tremolo bar.

I've tried many things, I've highered the action (just to see what would happend, no dice), I took out a spring, I've taken one of the springs and put it diagonally, and no matter what, my tremolo feels reminiscent of a squire tremolo. It feels like I'm overlooking something. I've looked around these forums and I haven't found anything, does anyone know a solution to this problem? I just want to get my tremolo loose so it is easier to push down/up.

Thanks
#2
grease it or something, i dunno, i personally have mine set flush cause i dont use it often
#4
the strings are stretched ( I give my strings a nice stretch across the fretboard multiple times before I lock em) Its just very hard to press on the tremolo.

I might go somewhere to get it looked at I was just wondering if this was a common problem I could fix myself
#5
yea u just got to give it time......and btw 9's are my fav to thats what i play
My gear:
Line 6 spider 2 75 watts
ibanez rg 570
fender hss hwy 1 stratocaster
washburn acoustic
#6
well hopefully you are correct but I've been having this guitar for the better part of 3 years now and it was always a little tighter than other guitars I've played, but it was never as tight as it was after I changed gauges.
#7
i've used a lot of floyd rose trems so..here goes..

you should have 3 springs on the back
set them so the 2 bottom are straight and the top 1 is at a slant
obviously the thicker the string gauge the worse its gona get
just giving the strings a few good bends isnt enough to actually stretch them addequetly
just tune as you usually do and keep the trem unlocked for the first week, feel free to lock it while playing if needed
the springs do not need to be tightened all the way
if you need to counter the string tension it is better to move the springs to slants accordingly

also, this has happened to be once or twice before, but while restringing a floyd rose guitar you need to be careful that some strings dont go to a sort of 'twice tuned'
this is when for example:
while tuning your low E string you get to an E but actually go all the way through the other tuning notes all over again and once again arrive at an E
when you pick the string it will sound like an E but the string will be MUCH too tight
if you think this has happened, simply lower it all the way until you hit E again on your tuner and retune your other strings

Sorry if thats a little confusing, its hard to explain

Floyd roses are indeed a pain, but at first they may seem as though they are too much trouble, after restringing one so many times you'll figure out the tricks and so on by youself

The real trouble is just getting the action low using a floyd rose bridge

good luck :]
#8
3 springs on the back, I did that
But with my intent to loosen up the bar, I took one out, it didnt work
2 of them are now at a slant with the straight one in the center

The bridge is parallel to the body
I did not tighten anything all the way, althought I did lower the action as much as possible for playability.

"twice tuned" You don't have to spoon-feed it to me, although I appreciate you trying to explain it in depth. No I did not tune a string an octave higher than its supposed to be.

Maybe I'm just expecting it to be too loose, I saw a video on youtube where you flick the tremolo really hard and it makes a flutter noise, and my bar is much too tight to do that, could it be that an original floyd rose is looser than a licensed one?
#9
Quote by Asyilius
3 springs on the back, I did that
But with my intent to loosen up the bar, I took one out, it didnt work
2 of them are now at a slant with the straight one in the center

The bridge is parallel to the body
I did not tighten anything all the way, althought I did lower the action as much as possible for playability.

"twice tuned" You don't have to spoon-feed it to me, although I appreciate you trying to explain it in depth. No I did not tune a string an octave higher than its supposed to be.

Maybe I'm just expecting it to be too loose, I saw a video on youtube where you flick the tremolo really hard and it makes a flutter noise, and my bar is much too tight to do that, could it be that an original floyd rose is looser than a licensed one?

i think thats basically it, i have the same trem on my guitar and its always been a lot stiffer compared with an OFR. the way you say yours went from being softer and easier to move then went became harder is a bit weird though.
#10
perhaps it was my imagination I don't know, but I guess you're right about the OFR. So thanks guys, I'll just have to deal with it till I can replace it or just get a new guitar
#11
You may have worn out or damaged pivot points. You said the guitar was a few years old. May have finished the trem off when you changed strings. Some LFR's are not made of the best metal (too soft) and wear out sooner.