#1
I'm looking for some kind of software that would allow me to break a note down into the main pitch and the harmonics, as well as measuring the volume of each pitch and harmonic present. Is there any such software? If there is, could you recommend any in particular and tell me how much it would cost? If there's something other than software I could use, that's cool too.
#2
what do you need it for?
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#4
if there is its probably some professional software for those guys that study that kind of stuff and its probably like 1000 dollars
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#5
That's some Harvard shit right there.

Hope you can find something like that.
\,,/_[><]_\,,/
#6
I have to do a research project for school, and I got the idea to see what each tonewood does on a guitar... but I have a couple of other ideas if it's gonna be expensive.
#7
I doubt ordinary commercial equipment is capable of filtering a soundwave to within a single frequency.

^ what that means is, as far as I know, you can't separate just the fundamental or just the harmonics on your commercial soundcard.
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#8
Just remember... you can torrent ANYTHING.
Quote by denizenz
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Art & Lutherie
#9
Quote by Mad Marius
I doubt ordinary commercial equipment is capable of filtering a soundwave to within a single frequency.

^ what that means is, as far as I know, you can't separate just the fundamental or just the harmonics on your commercial soundcard.

I'm not looking for my soundcard to split it... I just want a program that analyzes a sound wave and says "The pitch of 'x' Hz is 'a' dB, the pitch of 'y' Hz is 'b' dB..." etc. I don't need to hear it, I just need to know the pitches/fundamental and harmonics and volumes.
Judging by these posts, I'm guessing I should fall back on plan b?
#10
^ Yea, your first idea was cool, but resort to the cheapest and easiest alternative.
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#11
Update: the technology is available, under the term pitch analyzer. It may exist under other names as well, that's just what I googled. I'm going to search multiple pitch analyzer next and see if anything new comes up. I've found some programs that identify the fundamental frequency, but all I can find for analyzing a group of pitches is some journal articles for complicated techniques. I'm still looking though. If anybody finds anything, please post it here. Thanks!