#1
Anyone wants to teach me some music theory history??

Here a few questions for you:
- Why was Melodic Minor "invented"?
- Why is Melodic Minor Ascending and Descending not the same?

If you know anything else that you'd like to share, go ahead!


I know that Harmonic Minor was invented so the V7 could still be possible (instead of v7) in minor keys but that's about all I know for Music Theory History at the moment!


By the way, this is not for any kind of homework/assignment/school work.... it's only for my curiosity!
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

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#2
Quote by hurlyz
Here a few questions for you:
- Why was Melodic Minor "invented"?
The melodic minor is just a major scale with a flattened third (I'm pretty sure most people will know this after a quick google search ), so I think it's just because someone wanted to play minor chords under a major melody. No Idea why anyone would want to do that though, that M7 makes the melodic minor unstable.
Quote by hurlyz
- Why is Melodic Minor Ascending and Descending not the same?
I think it has something to do with the singer. I've heard from a previous thread on the same question that its easier to sing that way. Also maybe descending with the melodic minor only sounds stable if the M7 and M6 is changed to a m7 and m6? I know it makes the melodic minor stupidly confusing.

It really isn't something to worry about. Most contemporary and jazz songs have the same scale descending and ascending. Its only the odd classical song that even uses the melodic minor.
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#3
Quote by hurlyz
Here a few questions for you:
- Why was Melodic Minor "invented"?
- Why is Melodic Minor Ascending and Descending not the same?

It goes back to the old church music and the use of early modes, but the basic answer is that when one singer was moving up the scale and another was moving down the scale, the melodic minor scale allowed them to either use dissonance or avoid dissonace.
#4
When ascending to the tonic, you get great resolution by singing/playing the major 7th right before. In a minor key, you would therefore have the harmonic minor if you just alter the 7th.

However, this leaves an augmented second between the b6 and 7, which is not very good for singers. So, we raise the 6 to make the intervals nice again.

As for descending, though, you don't need the seventh to point to the tonic, and in fact you probably don't want an unresolved major 7th played as you descend away from it. So you let the 7th be minor, and therefore the 6th can also be minor. Also, the b6 now wants to resolve to the 5th, which is perfect because you're descending.


That is my understanding, feel free to correct if some parts are not wholly correct, but I think it's about right.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#5
Look up tetrachords (I think there's a wikipedia entry for it).
The modern major scale came about through them.

I think it had something to do with the distant past the basic scale was 4 notes
(simple wind instrument had 4 holes, 1 for each finger). The tetrachord is a
4 note scale with the formula W W H. Glue 2 of those togther with a whole
step in between and you get: W W H W W W H.

It's actually useful knowledge even now, because knowing that the top and
bottom halfs of the major scale are basically identical, it can help you see some
symmetries in the patterns.
#6
Quote by psychodelia
When ascending to the tonic, you get great resolution by singing/playing the major 7th right before. In a minor key, you would therefore have the harmonic minor if you just alter the 7th.

However, this leaves an augmented second between the b6 and 7, which is not very good for singers. So, we raise the 6 to make the intervals nice again.

As for descending, though, you don't need the seventh to point to the tonic, and in fact you probably don't want an unresolved major 7th played as you descend away from it. So you let the 7th be minor, and therefore the 6th can also be minor. Also, the b6 now wants to resolve to the 5th, which is perfect because you're descending.


That is my understanding, feel free to correct if some parts are not wholly correct, but I think it's about right.


Yes, I remember in theory class, they told us that the reason for the raised 6th and 7th steps while ascending was to accomodate singers. good post.
#7
So you just want us to dump music history in here?
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



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#8
Quote by demonofthenight
It really isn't something to worry about.
I know... but I'm just curious!

Quote by nightwind
So you just want us to dump music history in here?
Yea it'd be cool... we could make it the OFFICIAL Music Theory History thread... and people would post what they know... I find it interesting!

Quote by psychodelia
When ascending to the tonic, you get great resolution by singing/playing the major 7th right before. In a minor key, you would therefore have the harmonic minor if you just alter the 7th.

However, this leaves an augmented second between the b6 and 7, which is not very good for singers. So, we raise the 6 to make the intervals nice again.

As for descending, though, you don't need the seventh to point to the tonic, and in fact you probably don't want an unresolved major 7th played as you descend away from it. So you let the 7th be minor, and therefore the 6th can also be minor. Also, the b6 now wants to resolve to the 5th, which is perfect because you're descending.


That is my understanding, feel free to correct if some parts are not wholly correct, but I think it's about right.
That seems right to me.... Thanks!
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

Quote by Resiliance
you show me yours and I'll show you mine!


If you're wondering where I've been gone, click here!
Last edited by hurlyz at Sep 10, 2007,
#9
I 2nd that motion.
That'd be a pretty cool idea, I've always been interested in WHY certian things are the way they are, as opposed to just knowing what they are.
I learn EVERYTHING in patterns, so it would accomodate me quite well.

Cheers -
Daisy
Gore AND Core; unite!
#10
Here's something I learned today....

I - Tonic
II - Supertonic
III - Mediant
IV - Subdominant
V - Dominant
VI - Submediant
VII - Leading Tone

Those are the scale degree's names... I knew them aldready but I've always wondered why VI was called Submediant while the Mediant was III... I mean, shouldn't Submediant be II??

Here's the explanation for it!

Quote by Wikipedia
In music, the submediant is the sixth tonal degree of the diatonic scale. It is so called because it is a third below the tonic, in contrast to the mediant being a third above the tonic.


Quite interesting, in my opinion!
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

Quote by Resiliance
you show me yours and I'll show you mine!


If you're wondering where I've been gone, click here!
#11
Pre Standard notation times, someone named Guido of Arezzo was credited with creating the "Guidonian hand". Monks would mentally burn the letters of the alphabet in an arrangement across the thumb, palm, and finger joints. So, the Cantor (the sort of head musician that actually knew what was going on in the church) would merely point to sections of his open hand, and the monks could sing their devoted little hearts out.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.