#1
Okay FINALLY! ive figured it out!

The way i started guitar was the shapes of " chords, G, E, Em, F ( kinda its a lil harder at first ), C, D, Dsus, A, Asus.

Pretty much, I learned some songs, im christian, so praise songs, you know? rythm guitar..

and thats were i went wrong! yay for .. that one guy.. who helped me lol.

Anyways FINALLY! each chord has its scale right? the E major scale, wich is were the E chord comes from.. am i right?

so once you learn each chord, learn the scale ( or opposite ) then you can play like blues improv...?

Am i finally getting it? or am i just.. wrong again..
#2
Nope....

Each scale comes from a Key. That scale contains the notes in all the chords in that key.

Also, if you want to learn to improv over blues... learn the blues scale.
#3
is there only 1... ( blues scale? )

5-8 5-7 5-7 5-7 5-8 5-8?

_____________________

As to what i was saying..

so basicly i was right except before the scales for each chord comes a key?

or is it each scale comes from a key not a chord, the key of G wich the scale G comes from aswell the chord G?
Last edited by Gibszon at Sep 11, 2007,
#4
thats actually...a really good way to start as oppose to the normal/typical "noob jumping into leads" approach

hats off to you
#5
Quote by Gibszon
is there only 1... ( blues scale? )

5-8 5-7 5-7 5-7 5-8 5-8?

_____________________

As to what i was saying..

so basicly i was right except before the scales for each chord comes a key?

or is it each scale comes from a key not a chord, the key of G wich the scale G comes from aswell the chord G?

No, and that isn't the blues scale anyways, that's just pent minor.



You move that up and down the fretboard to get the key you want. Position one starting at the 5th fret is in the key of A, starting at the 6th is in the key of A#/Bb, at the 3rd is in the key of G. Whatever note is played on the low e at the first note of the first position is what key it is in.
#6
Now im confused.. anyone care to explain it fully?

id rather understand everything.
#7
the scale you first said was the aminor penatonic.
the blues scale but adds the "blue note"
bassically play the scale you originally said but add the 6th fret low e string and the octave, 8th fret g string.
and that's the "a" blues scale, but i found that more blues uses the minor pentatonic.
#8
The key of the scale is noted by the first note of said scale. So if you start a scale on an A note, the scale is in the key of A, and so forth.

The main site has some great music theory FAQs, though I'd recommend a teacher if you really want a full understanding of scales and theory.

Good luck!
#9
You're pretty close to be honest - in fact it's a bit of a chicken and egg situation as to which cmoes first. Suffice to say that chords and scales are inherently linked, and the major scale of any particular note will give you the structure from which to construct any chord you want.

The thing to remember is that scales are a pattern of intervals (the spaces between two notes) they remain constant no matter where you play a particular scale...if you learn the intervals then you can play a scale anywhere. As far as different keys go the pattern remains the same, you just transpose it to the relevant fret.

Look into the major scale first as that's the most important. When you have an understanding of how it works look at the minor scale and the major and minor pentatonic. Pentatonics are just the full major or minor scale minus two notes...they're commonly used for soloing.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
@stevel Seagull.

Thanks, so notes on a scale is what conducts music right? so say a blues scale, then if i "improved" like some notes on a blues scale with hammers or what ever, it would be considered.. blues right?
#11
The blues scale is effectively the minor pentatonic with an extra note, however it's easier to understand it if you follow the path from the major scale. The major scale is the focal point of western music, in general it sounds happy and somewhat triumphant. The natural minor scale tends to sound sad and melancholy, this is another 7 note scale, like the major scale. It also happens to be a mode of the major scale so it has an inherent link with it.

A pentatonic scale is a simplified 5 note version of a full 7-note scale, the minor pentatonic is comonly used in blues soloing and is a goof, all-round scale to use when soling in blues or rock. Because of the missing notes it means it is less tied to one chord, however there's nothing to stop you using notes outside a scale. They'll often sound "wrong", however if you use the wrong note at the right time you can create some really exrpressive music. The blues scale is actually a 6-note scale consisting of the minor pentatonic with an extra note (namely a flat 4th), this extra note doesn't always sound good if you dwell on it, but if you use it as a stepping stone to other notes it can add real dynamism to the sound.

Scales are an absolute must for learning to solo, however once you get good with them the ability to use notes outside the scale for maximum effect is what set's truly great players apart.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#12
Quote by steven seagull


A pentatonic scale is a simplified 5 note version of a full 7-note scale, the minor pentatonic is comonly used in blues soloing and is a goof, all-round scale to use when soling in blues or rock. Because of the missing notes it means it is less tied to one chord, however there's nothing to stop you using notes outside a scale. They'll often sound "wrong", however if you use the wrong note at the right time you can create some really exrpressive music. The blues scale is actually a 6-note scale consisting of the minor pentatonic with an extra note (namely a flat 4th), this extra note doesn't always sound good if you dwell on it, but if you use it as a stepping stone to other notes it can add real dynamism to the sound.


A b4?!?! Are you INSANE

Lol jokez, but its a b5.
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#13
Quote by Peanut1614
A b4?!?! Are you INSANE

Lol jokez, but its a b5.

Well done, you spotted my deliberate mistake, have a gold star

Nah, you're right, I phailt
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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