#1
I want to learn how to play jazz. I've been listenting to it receantly and i really like its running progressive basslines. So are there any special jazz scales i should know about? I dont even know where to start so any help will be appreciated. Thanks
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#2
Lydian b5 is a Jazz-y scale. A lot of Blues players use that scale to create a Jazz feel and sound to their playing, that's the only one I know.
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#3
What is lydian b5? I haven't heard of it before and it seems that the b5 would sound the same as the #4, but it could just be my ignorance

On another note, some useful jazz scales to be used are ionian or lydian over major chords, dorian over minor, mixolydian or lydian dominant over dominant 7ths, and locrian or locrian #2 over half diminished. Arpeggios are also widely used, either to fit over the chord or altered to create tension. Most of the jazz sound comes from phrasing though, and the best way to learn that is to listen to jazz.
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#4
modesmodesmodesmodes
be sure to learn all the regular ones before anything else

then learn the ones of the harmonic and melodic minors if you have type

and theres the bebop scales, worth mentioning, but they're basically a couple of the regular modes with a chromatic passing tone thrown in (bebop dominant = mixolydian with both the b7 and regular 7)


and along with that, learn as much as you can about chords, extended chords, altered chords, etc.....
for a start, known all the different seventh chords, how they sound, different voicings, etc.... (7,maj7,m7, m7b5, °
#5
Quote by Alter-Bridge
Lydian b5 is a Jazz-y scale. A lot of Blues players use that scale to create a Jazz feel and sound to their playing, that's the only one I know.


Is there such a thing as lydian b5? i've heard of lydian dominant and lydain altered but never b5, the b5 seems a bit redundant since you ahve the #4.
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Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




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#6
Jazz isn't about scales as such, you're better off startin playin changes with extended arpeggios.
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#7
Learn about chord progressions first, such as the ii-V-I. Pretty much everything is built from that. Then just play the notes that sound good to you.
#8
Quote by seljer
modesmodesmodesmodes
be sure to learn all the regular ones before anything else

then learn the ones of the harmonic and melodic minors if you have type

and theres the bebop scales, worth mentioning, but they're basically a couple of the regular modes with a chromatic passing tone thrown in (bebop dominant = mixolydian with both the b7 and regular 7)


and along with that, learn as much as you can about chords, extended chords, altered chords, etc.....
for a start, known all the different seventh chords, how they sound, different voicings, etc.... (7,maj7,m7, m7b5, °


All good, except i'd emphasize things differently. After dorian, mixolydian, and ionian, I'd say the other scales you mention tend to be more prevalent than the remaining diatonic modes.
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