#1
I have a few questions

Im writing a song, Its in the key of C. (no accidentals)
My chord progression at the start is (vi-IV-I-V)

I have wrote the intro [rythm,lead(acoustic),drums], and Im trying to figure how to join the intro to my first verse.
The intro is slow and acoustic (arpeggios) backed by rythm with a steady drum beat, but i want it to get heaver after the intro.
For the change, Instead of the acoustic lead, its turns to a distorted lead, and the tempo increases (from 100 to say 120).
How do I make it change without it sounding rubbish
Should i use a certain chord between the transition ?
A chord that creates dissonace?
Or do I need to find out about cadences ?

Thanks for any help
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Last edited by iruka2998 at Sep 11, 2007,
#2
If you want to move smoothly between sections, you could try ending the intro with a V7 or vii diminished chord/arpeggio. This effectively creates a tension, which is released by the next section.

Learning about cadences would definitely be useful. I don't know much about them, but the important ones are, I think:

Perfect: V7 - I, sounds very final, like a musical full stop.
Plagal: IV - I, sounds final, like the "amen" in some hymns.

Imperfect: anything - V, sounds unfinished, like a musical apostrophe.
Interrupted: V - anything other than I , sound either like a surprising new ending or a move to something new depending on the second chord.

See here:

http://www.dolmetsch.com/musictheory22.htm
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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#3
One that you left out is the Deceptive cadence, which goes V-vi in major, or V-VI in minor. The vi/VI shares two notes with the i/I, so the resolution is close, but now you have a new root, and the third is different from the tonic. If the tonic is minor, the VI is major, and vice versa.

Now, I assume you're staying with the same chord progression? One idea might be: begin with arpeggiated chords (like you said). At the time of the transition, stay on the V chord for an extra one or two bars, to build up tension. During those bars, switch the arpeggiations to more aggressive strumming, and liven up the drums (maybe double the speed you're hitting the hi-hat, or something). Speed up the tempo, and then bring in the distortion just as you go back into the progression.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#4
I thought that interrupted cadences could be deceptive cadences, which is why I said interrupted cadences could sound "like a surprising new ending." I could well be wrong on that though
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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#5
Another question: to keep my song in the key of C, there must be no accidentals, but what If i had a part of the song, where the guitar hits say F-sharp, two/three times(within one bar).
Would it messup the whole song, or would my song still sound ok.

Yet another question: To keep a song in the key Of C.
Would i have to play only C scales/modes (not playing any accidentals though).
Or could I incorporate scales like 'A pentatonic minor' since there are no accidentals.

And thanks for the link, lots of reading
If anyone can answer these for me its really appreciated.
|-----| Gear |-----|

Ibanez RG(cnt remember)
Marshall MG30DFX
Line 6 Guitar Port


YOUTUBE PR0NZZ
Last edited by iruka2998 at Sep 11, 2007,
#6
Quote by iruka2998
Another question: to keep my song in the key of C, there must be no accidentals, but what If i had a part of the song, where the guitar hits say F-sharp, two/three times(within one bar).
Would it messup the whole song, or would my song still sound ok.

Yet another question: To keep a song in the key Of C.
Would i have to play only C scales/modes (not playing any accidentals though).
Or could I incorporate scales like 'A pentatonic minor' since there are no accidentals.

And thanks for the link, lots of reading
If anyone can answer these for me its really appreciated.


It would still be in C, just the F#s would be passing tones, I wouldnt rest too long on them unless you want some serious tension/dissonance. A minor pent. over a C chord is just C major I think?
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#7
Quote by Peanut1614
A minor pent. over a C chord is just C major I think?


Yeah I think so.


But if its in the key of C, am I allowed to use scales with root notes other than C ?
|-----| Gear |-----|

Ibanez RG(cnt remember)
Marshall MG30DFX
Line 6 Guitar Port


YOUTUBE PR0NZZ
#8
Don't feel that you have to use only notes in C major just so you can say "it's in key." What matters is how it sounds, and if it sounds good using lots of other notes and scales, go ahead and do it. No one cares if it is strictly diatonic, they care about the sound. You need to be able to write in key, but you're certainly not forced to.
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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#9
Quote by marmoseti
Don't feel that you have to use only notes in C major just so you can say "it's in key." What matters is how it sounds, and if it sounds good using lots of other notes and scales, go ahead and do it. No one cares if it is strictly diatonic, they care about the sound. You need to be able to write in key, but you're certainly not forced to.


thanks
|-----| Gear |-----|

Ibanez RG(cnt remember)
Marshall MG30DFX
Line 6 Guitar Port


YOUTUBE PR0NZZ