#1
You can do many different shapes with scales as long as you fallow the correct notes of that scale, right? Then where the hell do intervals come into play?! Their are atleast 13 different shapes for the major scale that I have seen! That ****ing frustrating.
...........

Also, can a half step also apply to moving unto a different string a fret down?
Thanks.
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#2
A different string a fret down would be way more than a half step...
#3
Quote by Llamai
A different string a fret down would be way more than a half step...

Then why does it claim that you have to go a half step to play the F in the major scale? Is it expecting you to play the whole ****ing scale on one string?
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#4
I can do it. So can you if you try hard enough.

Compare these, and tell me what you hear:

e--------------------------------------
B--------------------------------------
G--------------------------------------
D-------------------------1--2---------
A------------0---2---4-----------------
E--0--2--4-----------------------------


e-----------------
B------------------
G------------------
D-------------------
A------------------
E-0--2--4--5--7--9--11--12
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#5
Yeah, you have to go 4 frets down on the next string to get a half step. Unless it is the B string...
#6
Quote by zwart_gitaar
You can do many different shapes with scales as long as you fallow the correct notes of that scale, right? Then where the hell do intervals come into play?! Their are atleast 13 different shapes for the major scale that I have seen! That ****ing frustrating.
...........


A "shape" is only the way you happen to access notes on the fretboard. It's not
a scale.

Because of the way the guitar is tuned, there is more than 1 way to play the
exact same note. That's both a blessing and curse depending how you look at it.

An interval is the tonal diff between two notes. Like absolute notes themselves,
relative intervals can be played in more than 1 way. For example, a minor 3rd is
3 frets up on the same string or 1 string over and 2 frets down.
#7
Quote by zwart_gitaar
You can do many different shapes with scales as long as you fallow the correct notes of that scale, right? Then where the hell do intervals come into play?! Their are atleast 13 different shapes for the major scale that I have seen! That ****ing frustrating.
...........

Also, can a half step also apply to moving unto a different string a fret down?
Thanks.

Scales are nothing but intervals, so they're kind of important

The major scale is a constant, set pattern of gaps between notes (intervals), namely

WWHWWWH

where W represents a whole step between notes(2 frets) and H represents a half step between notes. If you take any note, anywhere on the fretboard and follow that pattern along from it you'll get the major scale for that note. Obviously the guitar has 6 strings, meaning notes repeat themselves, and playing along one string isn't always practical. A half step means just that, one fret further along. However, if you want to go from, for example, the A on the 5th fret of the low E to the Bb next to it you could also use the Bb on the 1st fret of the A string. Yes that's physically a 4 fret gap, but tonally it's just a half step.

That's why there's different fingering patterns from the major scale...they're all the same notes, just in different places. The important thing to remember is that the pattern of intervals remains constant.
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#8
Quote by zwart_gitaar
You can do many different shapes with scales as long as you fallow the correct notes of that scale, right? Then where the hell do intervals come into play?! Their are atleast 13 different shapes for the major scale that I have seen! That ****ing frustrating.
...........

Also, can a half step also apply to moving unto a different string a fret down?
Thanks.


there are only 12 major scales....
hello
#9
He means that you can play ONE major scale in 13 different ways (I have no idea if that's true or not yet).
Quote by Mazzakazza
Play Meshuggah. It is the solution.
#10
TS: do you know how to construct a major scale, and what the notes on the fretboard are? If you do it will help your understanding so much more. Let me know. It will show you the intervals, the steps, and why the scale is so moveable and changeable all over the fretboard.

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#12
I think he used that 13 as a random number.
And yes, there is more than one way, you are playing E major scale when you are playing E F# G# A B C# D notes.
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