#2
My God.

A measure is a set of notes contained inside 2 bar lines.
Play the man, Master Ridley; we shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
#3
Quote by yurfinlfntsy
My God.

A measure is a set of notes contained inside 2 bar lines.



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#4
dude... come on..

seriously?


no way...
Quote by screamingfool34
people here are idiot.
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the only good wahs out there are Slashs, Zacks, and Dimebags.
Quote by evan1234567
im to tired and confused to comprehend what you said.
#5
Quote by SGuitarist33
aahhaahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah


Do you doubt my awesome theory?
Play the man, Master Ridley; we shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
#6
OK I'm not sure I can explain this clearly but I'll try.

A song (written notation) is made up of sections, ( A, B, C Coda, etc) and divisions called measures. Let's say for simplicity's sake a song is in 4/4 time. 4/4 would usually be written vertically similar to a fraction in written sheet music. That means a measure, one of those divisions, is 4 beats (the first or top number) and that a quarter note (one of the note symbols used in written music) is one beat (bottom number). I think it may be more correctly stated that a whole note is 4 beats, which divides out to one beat for a quarter note, It's been quite a few years since high school band...3/4 would be 3 beats per measure, a quarter note still being one beat.

Not easy to understand right? Ok, take the song Old McDonald. It's in 4/4 time. The first line, "Old McDonald had a farm" is one measure, 4 beats. The beats would be on the bold text here:

Old McDonald had a farm...1, 2, 3, 4. That's a measure. The next 4 beats would be another measure, and so on.

3/4 time works the same, but 3 beats per measure. 1,2,3, 1,2,3, 1,2,3 each set being a measure. Also called a "bar" by a lot of informal musicians, either term is considered acceptable. "12 bar blues pattern" is referring to a blues chord structure that requires 12 bars, or measures, to complete the pattern before it repeats itself. So if you know that you can count your way through a song even if you're not familiar with it, provided you know what key it's in, you know when the chord changes are, and when the verses should start and end, etc just by keeping count of the 12 measure pattern, 4 beats at a time if it's 4/4 time.

So if someone tells you a song has a stop 12 bars into the first verse, you know when to stop. Count 12 measures, each being 4 beats, 1-2-3-4, and expect that stop.

Ok does that make any sense at all?
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...