#1
I need to know how to sight read-perfectly. I can do it pretty well, but it still takes me a bit of figuring out, I want to just be able to do it perfect. I'm not talking about tabs, I'm talking about actual music.
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#2
I know you're gonna hate to hear this, but the best way to get good at sightreading is to practice, practice, practice. If you read a random piece for 15-20 minutes each day you'll start to get better and better.
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#3
Yeah, invest in a big book sheet music (The Real Book) and sight read it. Then search for a recorded version and see how you match up.

To get better you just have repeat... the way you tackle reading is unique to you (position, chord voicing) and you find your style by practicing consistently.
Last edited by NotAJock2Day at Sep 12, 2007,
#4
Yeah, it's true. And it's boring and annoying... But nuts and bolts man. Go forth and woodshed!
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


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#5
Heres Steve Vai's take on it



do it at a constant tempo without stopping for mistakes
and just practice it a whole lot

I've seen people recommend "Reading Studies for Guitar" by Leavitt for basic literature...but like mentioned there, try doing it with whatever you can get your hands on
#6
@Steve Vai

He's really a dedicated dude. Going out for 2 times entire summer just to learn to sight-read?
Then finding out that you are ''just'' mediocre and continuing?
I really admire him. I couldn't do it.
Maybe that's why he is Steve Vai and I'm... a amateur?

But anyways, listen to him it seems like good advice.
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#7
Hymnals are also good for sight reading. If you get an accompanist's guitar edition, it's good for both melody and chords. (makes note to take own advice and dig Glory & Praise out of the back of the car) I'm recommending a hymnal for the same reason sometimes voice teachers will assign a soprano a mezzo aria by a particular composer rather than something from the appropriate fach- to learn the skills without screwing up one's bread and butter repertoire. If you can't get a mistake out of muscle memory, far better for it to be in a piece you'll never take out of the practice room.
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#8
Why the hell won't people understand that sight reading isn't any different to reading notation normally. It's the same thing, being able to sight read well just means you can read notation so well that you can play it upon looking at it. And as with improving playing the only way to get better is to practice. Don't practice just reading but writing in standard notation as well as both will help you improve, it's how I've improved my treble clef reading over the summer, by writing a few sax parts.
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#9
^to whoever was ranting, I can read standard notation just fine (i play trumpet too) its just that when i try to transfer it over to guitar, it takes me a bit. I know the notes on the guitar really well too...i think i just have some sort of mental block. And I played from the real book last year, and never thought of using it to sightread. Thanks for the advice!
"Hate is just baggage, lifes too short to be pissed off at everybody all the time." - American History X

Founder of the official Liquid Tension Experiment club, PM me to join!

In Soviet Russia, Acid Trips You!
#10
what i did was get a big book on jazz improvisation and read through it looking at ALL the modal scales in ALL the keys, took ages but it helped me
#11
Quote by Monkey36
^to whoever was ranting, I can read standard notation just fine (i play trumpet too) its just that when i try to transfer it over to guitar, it takes me a bit. I know the notes on the guitar really well too...i think i just have some sort of mental block. And I played from the real book last year, and never thought of using it to sightread. Thanks for the advice!


Reading isn't only recognising the notes, it's only one part of it, if you can't play it as you identify the notes it's like seeing words but not knowing what they mean (not the best analogy I know). Just do some basic stuff like identifying the position of open strings on the staff then maybe the first position notes for the lowest 3 strings then the highest 3 strings etc and split it into blocks.
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#12
Another thing you might want to look at are how the things you already know look on the staff. Take a melody or a few chord shapes that you already know well on the guitar and either write them out yourself, or find them somewhere else. The more and more you do this the more you will see patterns in the notation and the more you will be able to connect those little black dots with your playing.
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