#1
ok so first how do you determine what key something is in?

before posting links realize that ive read alot about it and none of it really seems to make sense to me.

next how do you identify chord progressions? and is it even important to do so?

for example if something was

dsus2 A Bm G A

or something like

Bm F# D E

The Reson im asking these is because i would like to start making some of my own music but figured it would be best to really understand others first
#2
You find out what key a song is in by the notes and/or chords being played. The notes in a key come from the Major (or Minor) scale from that key, and this is found out through a template. The intervals (Distance between two notes) is what makes up the major scale, and it goes like this.

Tone Tone Semitone Tone Tone Tone Semitone

Tones are two frets on the guitar, and semitones are one fret. Starting from a C Note, you would get this set of notes, called the C Major scale.

C D E F G A B C

If we started from a G note, and followed the same set of intervals, you would get the G Major scale.

G A B C D E F# G

A chord is made up of three or more notes played at the same time. However, you can't just play any three notes as this could sound terrible (Try playing C, D, and E together, sounds horrible!). So what you need to do is play thirds (Play a note, miss a note, play a note) so a C Major chord is made up by leapfrogging notes. The notes in bold are the ones that make up a C Chord.

C D E F G A B C

Each key has a set of chords, the template for any major key is :

Major
Minor
Minor
Major
Major
Minor
Diminished.

So, the chords in C Major are :

C Major
D minor
E minor
F Major
G Major
A Minor
B Diminished.

So, the chords dsus2, A, Bm, G, and A are in the key of D Major.

If you need any more help, I suggesting asking in the Musicians Talk forum, you will get much better responses there.
New To Town With A Made Up Name

In The Angel's City

Chasing Fortune And Fame
09/03/2012
#3
The only fool proof way to determine what key something is in is to analyze every note and chord played and determine which scale(s) they are derived from.
A much quicker but not guaranteed to be accurate way would be to look at the first and last chord played. If they are the same then you can be pretty sure that the song is in that key, if they are different its probably in one of those keys, not guaranteed though.
#4
ok and another quick question say im putting something like I IV V progression in G

so

G C D

could i use any kind of g c or d chord instead of just major

like could i throw in a csus or a c7 and still keep it true to they key?
#5
Csus and C7 would work fine, as long as they are still in a Major form of chord.
New To Town With A Made Up Name

In The Angel's City

Chasing Fortune And Fame
09/03/2012
#7
I just listen to the song heaps, have a guitar or something with notes, and try and find what notes the song has. The 'main' note will pretty much turn out to be the root note, and you can just figure out stuff like scales/progressions/major/minor things out from that >.<

Btw: Keys don't have to be a rule. You can bend them as much as you want to make it sound how you want- otherwise it's not really you making music- it's you choosing music.
Who reads sigs anyway
#8
could i use any kind of g c or d chord instead of just major


If it fits into the key of G major it should be fine.

For example, a Gmaj9 will fit because it contains GABDF# and they are all found in the G major scale. A Gm9 however will not fit because its notes (GABbFD) are not all found in the G major scale.
Same applies for variations of your C and D chords. Figure out what notes in the chord youre playing and see if they can be found in the G major scale.

Csus and C7 would work fine, as long as they are still in a Major form of chord.


Not really sure what you're saying here. I dont see how a Csus can be in 'a major form of chord' since suspended chords are neither major or minor. In any case, neither Csus or C7 fit into the key of G major.

Of course, as strong_wizard touched on, you dont have to stick to only the chords that fit into a key, plenty of songs contain out of key chords. If it sounds good, play it