#2
take off your pickguard get some foil and rubber cement, and you shield the body cavities with the foil.
#4
Like the other guy said, get a noise gate. Never heard of the one he mentioned though. The one I prefer is the MXR M-135.
#5
for a simpler solution, get a longer cable, sit further from your amp, do not sit with the guitar perpendicular to the amp (i.e the pups facing the amp) and turn down the gain a fraction, or the volume on your guitar
Quote by Kutanmoogle
Now introducing Megabreth, Dave Mustaine's signature Tic-Tac!


Member of the ENGL Family

Gear:

Hamer Vector
OLP John Petrucci
ENGL Thunder 50
EHX Holy Grail
EHX Small Clone
EHX Big Muff USA
Boss DD-3
Vox V847
Korg Toneworks OD
#6
Quote by Storm_Bringer_
for a simpler solution, get a longer cable, sit further from your amp, do not sit with the guitar perpendicular to the amp (i.e the pups facing the amp) and turn down the gain a fraction, or the volume on your guitar

Definitely do what this guy said. Sit farther away from your amp. Here's how feedback works:
The speakers in your amp and the pickups in your guitar are nothing but magnets. When the two magnets get close to each other, they resonate. This resonance creates feedback. So to have them not resonate, sit farther away from your amp.
#7
Foil shielding will do nothing for feedback. Stuff some foam or cotton in your pickup cavities to cut down the resonance in these chambers. If you are getting microphonic feedback (the high pitched stuff you hear when you put the guitar right on the speaker), then move back or aim the amp away from you.
#8
We're going to need a little more information about your gear and settings before we can help me....depending on that info some of the answers could be.

...turn down the gain
...move the pickups further away from the strings
...turn down the gain
...stop trying to overdrive the distortion channel of a solid state amp with a pedal
...stand further away
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
Quote by gnrlover1
ok, i have a ****ty squier strat and a microcube. I DONT KNOW WHAT THE PUP CAVITIES OR OR WHERE THEY ARE!

when you take off the pickgaurd, there should be slots that the pickups go into. mine actually has a big rectangle space and not cavities.
#12
Forget shielding, just turn the gain down and stand further away.

Oh, and face AWAY from the amp.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#15
There's not a whole lot of things you can do other than what the players have told you about position and turning down gain. I am assuming you have single-coil pickups in your Squier. Single-coils, especially budget ones are just prone to feedback. Shielding and noise-gates will not help, unless you turn the noise gate sensitivity so much that it cuts out a lot of your guitar notes. You could dip the pickups in wax, but its a lot of trouble for so small a return. Don't play loud in small rooms, especially with hard walls (like cement or plaster. You really need a guitar with humbucking pickups if you are going to play with high gain and high volume.
#16
Quote by gnrlover1
but steven, what if im playing something that requires gain, thats no solution


Ok dude,

1. Turn Treble a bit down.
2. Try using not only the bridge pickup, but the other pickups and/or other pickup combinations.


If the guitar feedbacks while you mute the strings, you have a problem.
=>Fender Highway 1 Stratocaster with Alnico V Holydiver Bare Knuckle bridge humbucker

=>40 Watt RMS Yorkville Traynor YCV-40 valve amplifier

=>30 Watt Tech 21 NYC - Trademark 30 solid amplifier

=>Dunlop GCB-95 Crybaby pedal
#17
Quote by gnrlover1
but steven, what if im playing something that requires gain, thats no solution

Then you just have to accept the limitations of your equipment.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#19
^ then maybe you have it just a bit too loud... turning down the volume a notch might do wonders...

or you oculd have your amp near other electronics (computers, tvs, etc) that messes with the sound
Quote by Gibson_Rocker13
you are my new hero cause i do the exact same thing but i suck at it

#8 of the EHX USERS GUILD
Quote by SublimeGuitar
Orange Rocker 30. Best Marshall ever

epi firefly dsp 30, epi sg, big muff
olp five string, peavy max 158
#20
Great example of why using abbreviations is not a good idea. How is a newcomer to guitar supposed to know what a pup cavity is? I've been playing 45 years and it took me a month of seeing that all over the place to finally figure it out. Guitars have PUPS??? PUP cavities??? HUH??? I've never seen any dogs around any of my guitars...

PICKUP cavity...is typing 3 more letters really all THAT hard??? If you're too lazy to type 3 more letters and make sure your post is understandable to newcomers, why bother posting at all if you're just going to cause confusion. This guy even TOLD YOU in the original post he didn't know what a pup cavity is...

QUOTE
if u talk about the pup "cavities" tell me what they are first!
END QUOTE

And nobody bothered to explain it in an understandable manner...till he posted it again in all caps to get it through your thick heads...he's obviously seen it enough times to know it was probably going to come up, that tells me it's a problem. People are constantly abbreviating, and someone unfamiliar with guitars and guitar lingo has no idea what you're talking about.

I saw this same scenario earlier in another post, how is a newcomer to guitar supposed to know that TOM is a Tune O Matic bridge? I didn't, I only found out quickly the first time I saw it because someone just after that posted the proper name, not the abbreviation. If not I'd still be wondering, and I've played a long time, I'm no newbie.

OK I'll stop ranting...but you folks need to seriously consider typing the proper names for these things. After all, you're not too lazy to type the entire word "Telecaster" or "Stratocaster" for your signature, the full name of your amp, a list of guitars, amps and effects...and you won't type 6 letters - PICKUP - in a post...

Anyway back to the topic:

I'm seriously wondering if this is a case of microphonic pickups. Microphonic pickups are those that feedback any time possible no matter what you do. It has nothing to do with gain, shielding, position in relation to the amp, or even volume in some cases, but it won't usually happen at really low volume. I have a telecaster copy that had a microphonic pickup, it worked great at low volume but soon as I got onstage with it, the thing would feedback the instant I took my fingers off the strings, every time, including during the first set while the volume level was still pretty low. I got home, plugged into my Fender Champ, turned it up a bit above my normal practice volume, and there it was.

Finally found out what it was, potted the pickup and it works perfect now. I can't get it to feedback onstage even if I stand 2 feet from my Super Reverb with it cranked to 10. Damn thing won't feedback even if I want it to...and this does ot affect the sound of the pickup at all, if done properly it should not affect functionality either.

A good description of microphonic pickups and potting instructions Here

It's not hard to do, just watch the temperature, make sure you have something fixed up to securely hang the pickup in place and pull it back out, (I used picture wire) and stick around to watch closely for the bubbles to stop. Clean the excess wax off the tops soon as possible, and DO NOT touch the open coils if they are exposed. the tiny wires are easy to break. I used a potpourri pot to do mine, and some plain ordinary Gulfwax.

If you're not sure, take it to a reputable shop and have it checked out. Try it on a couple of different amps, I'm sure friends might let you do that, most music stores probably will too.

Shielding - Shielding is a good idea too, it will seriously cut down excess noise in general, but will not affect microphonic pickups, or feedback, the good kind. I shield all my guitars with heavy duty aluminum foil and spray glue. It works great. Shielding At least do the pickguard, it makes a difference. If you do pickup cavities and all, it will probably sound like a new guitar.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#21
wow, thanks pete for taking the time to make such an elaborate post. btw, i knew what the pups were, i just didnt know what the cavities were! hehe, but u still raise a helluva point. it took me a month to figure it out. pup, pup pup pup, PICKUP AH!!!!
#22
Don't feel too bad about it dude, I'm still trying to figure out what things like "pwnd" "ftw" and "woot" are.