#1
i think it has something to do with note you start of and which notes you land on, but i need some clarification on how scales like C major and G Mixolydian are unique from each other. what do you have to do when playing these scales containing the same notes to get the unique sounds from each?
Quote by loganrocksabass

how can your girlfriend be in your band if she's in the kitchen?
#3
i realize that it changes the sound dramatically but im fairly new with scales in general and im looking for tips on how to make them sound different.
Quote by loganrocksabass

how can your girlfriend be in your band if she's in the kitchen?
#4
+1 to seljer

And we name them because of chordal background.
Do you have keyboards at home? Try playing C major scale over different chords of C major scale (Dmin7, Cmaj7, Am etc.).
You'll notice what I'm trying to prove.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#5
Quote by quinny1089
the best way to get the sounds of modes in my opinions is to get something to play a drone, or to strum the same chord over and over again while you fiddle around with the modes.

So if there is a G note droning...

fiddle around in G ionian, then say...G lydian, then G mixolydian, and then the others...this will make the signature sounds of the modes really stand out...

a really good example of this is joe satrianis "Pitch Axis Theory" look it up on youtube


The problem with that is not all modes with G as the root, will contain all of the notes in a G major triad (assuming thats what you`re talking about). For instance, G-Dorian will not contain a B, which is the 3rd interval of the Gmaj chord. So the differences you will be hearing will be dissonance, and wont always work cleanly over some chords.

Granted some music strives for dissonance, however, I don`t believe that is the point here.
“It's easy to play any musical instrument: all you have to do is touch the right key at the right time and the instrument will play itself.” -Johann Sebastian Bach

Quote by areola
anyone know some awesome porn riffs?
#6
Modes... Well, look through chords. In key of C you have C major and A minor. They're a lot different, although built from C major scale notes.
"The end result - the music - is all that counts"
#7
Quote by seljer
with modes you are changing where your "home" is, where you return to.


Its actually a bit more than that.

Each and every scale degree functions a certain way, not just the root.
So, while C Ionian and D Dorian may have the same notes, not only is
the root different, but every note has a different function between those
2 scales.
#8
Quote by LegendaryAXE
The problem with that is not all modes with G as the root, will contain all of the notes in a G major triad (assuming thats what you`re talking about).


Quote by quinny1089
So if there is a G note droning...


He means just the note, not the chord. I think that is an excellent way to get a feel for modes and how to use them.

Heres my little thing that I have saved for occassions such as this:

The way to use modes and get their different sounds is to think of the intervals it is made up of. Phrygian has a b2, a dark, dissononant interval. Lydian has a #4, which sounds... I dunno how to describe it but it sounds cool. Mixolydian is like the major scale but has a b7, making it bluesy and dominant.

Just drone the low E string, keep it ringing (clean setting works best). Then on the remaining five stings, play E Phrygian, E lydian, E Aeloian, E Ionian etc. and emphasise the unique intervals in each. Really listen to each scales' characteristics. Try making a melody from each mode while droning the E string.

Once you have done this, watch this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWHKeC4IEgA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoGQ9yHOyZQ
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
so the difference between these scales is emphasis on their unique notes is what im gathering. say your playing E Phygian, do you start and end all phrases on an E note or are there certain different notes for each key that will resolve it. i was playing B Locrian when i thought of this because when i kept starting and ending on B it never resolved so i began to wonder if there were other notes that resolve a key besides the root.
Quote by loganrocksabass

how can your girlfriend be in your band if she's in the kitchen?
#11
look up joe satriani on modes on youtube, he has some great ideas about the whole concept and if you havent heard of him just look up some of his songs, if you are using chords and soloing over them, you can change your scale in correspondence with the chords to change the entire mood of what you are playing, i believe that happens alot in jazz music.
#12
Quote by ratm92
so the difference between these scales is emphasis on their unique notes is what im gathering. say your playing E Phygian, do you start and end all phrases on an E note or are there certain different notes for each key that will resolve it. i was playing B Locrian when i thought of this because when i kept starting and ending on B it never resolved so i began to wonder if there were other notes that resolve a key besides the root.


That's probably just because you chose Locrian...it's very dodgy in the 'resolving' business.