#1
Hopefully this is the right spot for this. (just thought I'd show off my unsuredness ).

I have heard that recording your playing actually helps you improve as, when you listen to it, it sounds different (somehow >.> compared to when you hear it when you play it (this is you being the player, I am terrible at explaining things, just trying to be clear). Is this right? I have noticed a HUGE improvement in the solo for "Nothing Else Matters" by Metallica when I have done this, listened, noticed my mistakes, attempted to rectify them, record again, and repeat. Is this a good way of nailing solos?

Hopefully that isn't too confusing, but am I doing the right thing?

pepsi
#2
It is working isn't it?

Recording your practice routine intirely (or just important portions), either through video (if you can afford that, maybe with a webcam) or via tape is a great way to improve because you can fully concentrate on the sounds that you are making after playing, allowing you to focus on the parts that need practice.
#3
That's pretty much exactly what you should be doing, it's help me out with tons of things, not just guitar.

Like one song I like to do is a cover of a song in French. So I would record myself singing and strumming the chords, and it greatly helped me with my pronunciation of the lyrics.

So yes, you're doing the right thing.
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#4
In my opinion it seems to help quite a bit. Especially when you screw up real bad on some parts. But like you said it makes you realize your mistakes and work harder to fix them. If it works for you, than it is the right thing.
#5
Its probably already been said, but hearing yourself when your not playing is a great way to nit pick at your own playing and find ways to clean up and improve. Definitely recommend doing it, or if you don't have any way of recording, turn your delay way up and play for like 5 seconds and listen to it.
#6
it's good for when you're beginning, but i find that among experienced players, the people who record their riffs as practice tend to spend way too much time perfecting the recording aspect, and far too little time working on their playing or writing.

i'm of the mind that recording should be a fast and in-the-moment process, not an obsession, and that the best way to improve as a player is to play with others. but again, for the sake of beginners who are still learning how to get the sounds they want from the guitar, recording your practice sessions is good.
#7
recording is a great idea to monitor your playing.

If you feel stuck in a rut, all you have to do is record something, then listen to it a week later, and it will be noticibly better!
#8
Quote by frigginjerk
it's good for when you're beginning, but i find that among experienced players, the people who record their riffs as practice tend to spend way too much time perfecting the recording aspect, and far too little time working on their playing or writing.

i'm of the mind that recording should be a fast and in-the-moment process, not an obsession...


I'm guessing you mean that one shouldn't spend too much time recording just to get the exact solo that they want? Because I see no reason why working on the technical aspects of getting good recording quality is a bad thing.

I do agree that one shouldn't spend too much time recording one particular thing. To paraphrase a quote that I heard once, if you can't get a good recording in three takes, you aren't ready to record that part yet.


As for recording to monitor playing, I suppose the ultimate ideal would be recording yourself playing with a group. However, recording along to click tracks really helped me improve my timing. I noticed many moments where I hesitated or rushed, that my mind glossed over when I was just playing along to a metronome.
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#9
^

recording onself with a group is truly ideal. but yeah, as i say, while you're still mastering the overall concept of musicianship, recording yourself is a great tool. and what i meant by someone spending too much time on the recording side of things is that if your goal is to be a consumate MUSICIAN, you shouldn't spend any more time than is necessary on becoming a recording engineer.

It's not bad to record, and to study up a bit to get better sounds, but don't let the endless path of studio trickery and sound processing take you away from your goal of being a totally sick guitarist. I just know from seeing it happen to others that a person can waste months and years buying and learning how to use rack gear, effect processors, mixers, DI boards, etc, and they always end up going for long stretches without playing their instrument at all.

it seems to me that if you get good enough at playing, and focus on that, you'll have a better chance of getting connected with a REAL sound engineer who wants to record you.