#1
Does anybody here know anything about watches? My uncle gave me a watch a while ago, and recently, I've become interested in it's design. I googled it and with a little luck, I discovered that it's a Vostok watch. I've eBayed it's worth, but I can't find any watches like it. Is it because mine is a counterfeit or what? It's manual wind (but I overwound it a while ago. Hehe). The spinny thingy has lines indicating each minute and it's got numbers every 10 minutes. The face is green, and it's got a small paratrooper emblem, with a red star on top. Pics will be up after my damned camera charges.
Gear...
Peavey 5150, Squier, Ibanez RG2EX2, Yamaha F150, Ibanez RT150, MXR noisegate
#4
Quote by abcdboy
and it's got a small paratrooper emblem.....


was he in the forces by any chance??


What Goes Up



Must Come Down
#5
Quote by Stingz.
was he in the forces by any chance??

Yeah, Taiwan Navy. It's a Russian military watch though. So, unless he was like James Bond or something. Yeah...









Gear...
Peavey 5150, Squier, Ibanez RG2EX2, Yamaha F150, Ibanez RT150, MXR noisegate
#7
were you ebaying its worth because you intend to sell it?

i hope not, unless you wanna sell it to me cos that watch looks sick
#10
I haven't been into vintage watches in quite some time ( and only collected pocket watches ), and only collected U.S. brands, but just from looking at the design/wear, i'd say it's only a 90's model, ask your uncle when he purchased and if he got it new. Open up the back, see if it has any jewels in it, not familiar on how many watch companies actually did this in larger quanaties... Pretty much for just a rough guess from local collectors/shops in the area, something like that MIGHT go for 1- 3.00 . The larger value of a vintage watch comes from world altering stages, like a war, if it was produced during the war period, cost of building materials for non military personal will go up, ( take a look at prices of manufactured homes 4 years ago, compared to now ) . And many businesses, especially smaller corps, will slow production, sometimes even sell the company. Usually counting for a very small number of watches made vs say, a few years before the war.
"For many years the factory had been an official supplier for the Department of Defense of the USSR and produced watches exclusively for the Soviet military. In the past this watch could be purchased with a valid military ID ONLY in special Military shops that existed in USSR. "

Find a site devoted to USSR watches, all you need to do is find out what time period your watch was made. Nothing major going on in the period your watch was made? Probably not going to be worth much to a collector, something that effected the world in the metals market greatly, your watch might have a small value to it, speaking under 20.00 .. That's about all the suggestions I can give to ya. Hope it helps. BTW, as you've probably seen on Ebay, it's a Parachuters watch
#11
Quote by Viper100FM
I haven't been into vintage watches in quite some time ( and only collected pocket watches ), and only collected U.S. brands, but just from looking at the design/wear, i'd say it's only a 90's model, ask your uncle when he purchased and if he got it new. Open up the back, see if it has any jewels in it, not familiar on how many watch companies actually did this in larger quanaties... Pretty much for just a rough guess from local collectors/shops in the area, something like that MIGHT go for 1- 3.00 . The larger value of a vintage watch comes from world altering stages, like a war, if it was produced during the war period, cost of building materials for non military personal will go up, ( take a look at prices of manufactured homes 4 years ago, compared to now ) . And many businesses, especially smaller corps, will slow production, sometimes even sell the company. Usually counting for a very small number of watches made vs say, a few years before the war.
"For many years the factory had been an official supplier for the Department of Defense of the USSR and produced watches exclusively for the Soviet military. In the past this watch could be purchased with a valid military ID ONLY in special Military shops that existed in USSR. "

Find a site devoted to USSR watches, all you need to do is find out what time period your watch was made. Nothing major going on in the period your watch was made? Probably not going to be worth much to a collector, something that effected the world in the metals market greatly, your watch might have a small value to it, speaking under 20.00 .. That's about all the suggestions I can give to ya. Hope it helps. BTW, as you've probably seen on Ebay, it's a Parachuters watch

Oh boy. Thank you. I've actually failed to locate the exact watch over the internet at all. I'm hoping this watch isn't a fake. It's pretty nice.

More input would be appreciated.
Gear...
Peavey 5150, Squier, Ibanez RG2EX2, Yamaha F150, Ibanez RT150, MXR noisegate
#12
I still can't find any more information on this specific "paratrooper" style watch as far as a price estimate, i've even called up some old collectors I know... None of them are baffled by the history, just, a price estimate, i've got one guy who has a book on military issued watches who will look through it over the weekend... What I can tell you is more about the specifics of the watch, it's a 17 jewel ( 17 kamher is on the front ) The faceplate is most likely sky blue, that has faded out to seem green. And if your not familiar with why a watch would have 17 jewels in it, it's basically summed up as this :

The jewels in watches are either diamond ( unlikely this one has them ) Sapphire, ruby, garnet... The most commen is Ruby... Watches with a higher ammount of jewels, can SOMETIMES be more valuable, not alltogether because of the jewels themselves, it's the time, effort, reliability, and functionality that a jeweled watch gives.. They reduce friction, seeing as how they can be smoothed down quite respectively, and are MUCH harder then the metals you will find in a watch, they let metals inside of the watch slide more easily, reduced friction, longer life of the watch.... Most watches that DO have jewels in them have 15... Some companies place 17 in their watch, the most complicated watches can have up to 40 jewels that ARE actually used, and not just for show, Wonder why people pay so much for certain watches? Because if you go to the right company, the watch can last you the rest of your life. Such as you will see many vintage watches still running, while you can go spend 20.00 on a nice walmart watch, and see it die before the year ends.

Jewels placed in a watch can also act as shock absorbers, ( of course you'd wanted a jeweled watch as a paratrooper ) . Even taking a large shock on a well done watch, would only account for a small loss in "tick". Btw, if the watch isn't running atm, don't keep turning the winder endlessly, back when I first got into watches, I broke quite a few, winding...winding, and winding till I snapped something, a lot of older watches actually produce their power by mere wrist movements thanks to jewels .

I'll get back with ya when I can with more information.


BTW ----- If you happen to take any interest in this further, keep a look out for watch brands like, hamilton, rolex ( everyone should know this by now ) Elgin, Omega.. And many more, just do a general search on Ebay.... Look for a Hamilton 992B sidereal.... 22 bids, 4600.00 U.S., take a look at the inner workings, take in consideration that most watches with jewels have 15 that are FULLY functional, a smaller ammount with 17 that are functional, and very few 21 jewels that all serve a purpouse, keep a look out for this type of stuff if you ever venture into a garage sale etc... Mind you, many companies also took jewels to a new marketing lvl, having a total of 100 jewels in some cases, while maybe only 7 served a purpous ---- The waltham watch co, did this, and many bought into it.. The gems were often crued as well, not being cut very well etc.
Last edited by Viper100FM at Sep 14, 2007,
#13
A long time ago, I was walking dowm the street with my grandfather (had a heart-attack, he walks a few km ever day since then), when I saw this nice old clock (nothing to fancy, just old-looking clock) lying in the floor near a tree (obviously thrown away) I pointed this up to my grandfather, and he told me to pick it up. Next day he fixed it for me, and I've had it since then. Up to this day it's the only thing i have thats really mine.


I'll upload pics if you want to see it
--F-F-T-S---
--EbOla----
---name pending?--

Quote by PlayMadness
No. Everybody dies. And one day, given that your relationship doesn't crash and burn like so many do, one of you will end up deep in sorrow while watching the other one die.


#14
Sure , would love to see if it you got the time to upload pics. Might be able to get some history on it via PM so we don't Hijack the thread or anything.