#1
Anyone got any good songs (especially ones with solos) that are good for musical analysis? I'm trying to improve my lead guitar playing so I can write/play solos, and I've learnt all my scales and keys etc but I really want some examples so I can sit and go "OK the song is in [insert key] and the solo appears to be in [insert scale]."

So any recommendations? I like everything from pop-punk and emo and post-hardcore up to like death and black metal.

Just please, little/no power metal.

Thanks.


EDIT: Also any songs that will help me build up my speed, accuracy and control. Even if it's simple I can repeat it and speed it up and get really good at it, that'd be a great help!
Last edited by Heavens_To_Hell at Sep 14, 2007,
#2
between the buried and me?
necrophagist
the human abstract
death
dream theater
evile has some pretty good stuff...
and maybe in flames?

thats all i got right now
haha
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Boss Flanger
Lyon Chorus
#3
well if you're trying to learn songs that constantly change key try a some joe sastriani, I know he's not really "pop-punk and emo and post-hardcore up to like death and black metal", but his music is great for the key changing sort of stuff
#4
Quote by irishman
well if you're trying to learn songs that constantly change key try a some joe sastriani, I know he's not really "pop-punk and emo and post-hardcore up to like death and black metal", but his music is great for the key changing sort of stuff


No I like him too. I meant all that plus everything inbetween. And outside of the realms too. I have a pretty varied music taste.

Quote by SchecterC-1+Man
between the buried and me?
necrophagist
the human abstract
death
dream theater
evile has some pretty good stuff...
and maybe in flames?

thats all i got right now
haha


Any particular songs? I've got some dream theater tabs already but I didn't spend much time on them.
#6
Anything thats not so death/progressive/technical metalic? Like if I could get something to at least warm up on or something cause right now these are pretty f*ckin' hard.
#7
w00t for somebody bringing up something I'm very interested in as well...although I don't know how much our tastes mesh. Really, finding music to analyze isn't the tricky part...I'd focus on bands with identifiable sounds because, while it's the bands like the Beatles who could write totally different songs on the same album that might be my favorite, it's hard to draw conclusions from very limited amounts of a style. So let's say you pick a few choice cuts from SOAD, since they're in your avatar. The hard part is...what are you analyzing?? It will take you a few minutes to decide what key the song is in and what scale is used. Great, now what?? Most people stop here, but if you're persuing real knowledge of the style, you are going to have to look into the range of the melody, the contour of it, recurring rhythmic ideas, use of nonchord tones or suspended/extended harmonies, irregular progressions used, dynamics, structure of the whole piece, structure on a smaller level, etc...these are all very vague, but you can get down real gritty.

I made a thread about this before, got very few responses, but I plan to analyze a number of pieces from some bands I've been listening to a lot lately, trying to pick up on all of these things and to create a reference of pop/rock analysis for myself.


Edit: this still applies to lead analysis, except you'd be talking about more specifics. For example, specific tendencies in nonchord tones, small repeated rhythmic phrases, syncopation, note durations, techniques etc.
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Last edited by sirpsycho85 at Sep 14, 2007,
#8
Between the Buried and Me - Sellkies: The Endless Obsession?

The Faceless - Akeldama

Opeth - Deliverance

Gorod - Hidden Genocide

I'm sorry if those are too hard, lol. I just chose the most complex, not "speed" complex, but, you know, using different modes and stuff.

Also, The Dance of Eternity - Dream Theater.
Last edited by RedDeath9 at Sep 14, 2007,
#9
Quote by RedDeath9
Between the Buried and Me - Sellkies: The Endless Obsession?

The Faceless - Akeldama

Opeth - Deliverance

Gorod - Hidden Genocide

I'm sorry if those are too hard, lol. I just chose the most complex, not "speed" complex, but, you know, using different modes and stuff.

Also, The Dance of Eternity - Dream Theater.


Opeth Own I'll put them on the "when I kick ass" list.

EDIT:
Quote by sirpsycho85
w00t for somebody bringing up something I'm very interested in as well...although I don't know how much our tastes mesh. Really, finding music to analyze isn't the tricky part...I'd focus on bands with identifiable sounds because, while it's the bands like the Beatles who could write totally different songs on the same album that might be my favorite, it's hard to draw conclusions from very limited amounts of a style. So let's say you pick a few choice cuts from SOAD, since they're in your avatar. The hard part is...what are you analyzing?? It will take you a few minutes to decide what key the song is in and what scale is used. Great, now what?? Most people stop here, but if you're persuing real knowledge of the style, you are going to have to look into the range of the melody, the contour of it, recurring rhythmic ideas, use of nonchord tones or suspended/extended harmonies, irregular progressions used, dynamics, structure of the whole piece, structure on a smaller level, etc...these are all very vague, but you can get down real gritty.

I made a thread about this before, got very few responses, but I plan to analyze a number of pieces from some bands I've been listening to a lot lately, trying to pick up on all of these things and to create a reference of pop/rock analysis for myself.


Edit: this still applies to lead analysis, except you'd be talking about more specifics. For example, specific tendencies in nonchord tones, small repeated rhythmic phrases, syncopation, note durations, techniques etc.


Hey thanks. That's a LOT of help. I've tried analysing their stuff before but it's just so perfect... :P But I'll try analysing them, maybe even then creating lead lines over it for the practice of writing.
Last edited by Heavens_To_Hell at Sep 14, 2007,
#10
Do Pantera-Floods.
You'll find some interesting ideas, and it's not too hard.
Arpeggiating sus2 chords, then showing their tonality in short melodic line. (That's beginning)
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#12
Muse doesn't have a lot of guitar solos, but they've got a lot of stuff that's excellent for analyzing. In fact, I wrote an essay on some of their compositions (admittedly it's not that heavy on theory), if you're interested.

They've got interesting chord progressions, a bit of modulation, unique instrumental voices, and fascinating compositional ideas.
#13
I had alot of fun learning the guitar solo from Fermented Offal Discharge. Really quality work on that tune.
#14
Analyse some Malmsteen perhaps... Icarcus Dream Suite opus 4 is a good starting point....

Jason Beckers "Altitudes" perhaps too...
Frank Zappa's not dead. He just smells funny.