#1
I mean, I wouldn't know, I just bought a Martin D-16GT last month, and I would like to know. I heard something about the wood aging or something like that.

So, if you have an all solid guitar, it would just get better over time? I mean, with proper care and all. Any owners out there that can confirm this one? thanks.
#3
I have heard that solid-spruce top guitars do age well. they become more mellow toned and softer with age.
#4
tec speaking, if it sounds better with age, why not make the guitar that good in the first place..
#5
Quote by splinter26
tec speaking, if it sounds better with age, why not make the guitar that good in the first place..



you can't make them that way in the first place. dont you think they'd try to make wine like that? it just doesnt work.
Quote by breakdown123
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#6
think of if like a new pair of shoose. When you first put them on you like them but they realy feel nice after you have had them for a coupel weeks. Eventualy they start to weark out too.

Guitars are the same way. They are good in the beginning. Then after you play them in they loosen up and they sound better (it has to do with breakng down the bods between cell walls and looseining sap from inside the cells) but after 30 or 40 years of playing stuff starts to break down a wear out.
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#7
From what I understood of my gr 12 physics class is that: When the strings vibrate, they make other things around them vibrate (obviously.) The vibrations gradually line up the cells in the wood all nice so that it vibrates better with the wavelengths or whatever emitted by the strings. Sorry about the probably inaccuracies and definite ugliness of my explanation.
Quote by markr17
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#9
If the guitar is very good quality and all sides are solid wood, the guitar will definitely get better with age, but you have to play it. A classic example can be seen in violins. Stradivarius violins are the best sounding instruments ever made (and most expensive.. roughly 3 mil), and they were made in the 1700's. Even though people have made exact copies of them, they never sound as good as the originals.
#10
I read something about that lately. A lot has to do with the type of wood, where or what part of the tree it came from and the age of the tree. Many guitars should sound better in time but again it depends a lot on how well they were build to begin with. I spoke with a guy at a local guitar repair place that works on guitars for several stars. He said that select parts of guitars tend to ware out but he can fix just about anything. He mentioned one guy that plays on the stage with an old beat up guitar. He has rebuilt the neck and replace the frets twice for this guy in the last 30 years with little change to the sound.

The same guy also said that there are brands where the name, workmanship and age make them worth a lot plus they are rare. But the sound isn't as good as some $500 mass produced guitars. I guess that is why it's its best not to look at the brand but pay attention to sound and play ability.
#11
i have a classical guitar from about '65 and a steel string from '71, and they both are very mellow sounding, but i dont know about them sounding "better", just different... in a nice way.
#12
Better is subjective. I frankly don't want the tone of my guitar to change.
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#13
You're right. I was just wondering if it was sure, that my all-solid Martin guitar tone would might 'mellow' out...because I am VERY curious to what I'm gonna hear in a few years.
#14
Quote by sSyLc
From what I understood of my gr 12 physics class is that: When the strings vibrate, they make other things around them vibrate (obviously.) The vibrations gradually line up the cells in the wood all nice so that it vibrates better with the wavelengths or whatever emitted by the strings. Sorry about the probably inaccuracies and definite ugliness of my explanation.


You'd be right, It's how much you play not the amount of time it's sitting gathering dust. Also makes the wood alittle more compacted "dense" which adds to the tone.
#15
yes my guitar has a solid top and even though it was cheap at a garage sale, it was made in the 80s and the aged tone sounds better than my friends new taylor that was like $3000
#16
Yes, It takes years for the spruce top to fully mature (loosen up) Not so long for Cedar.
#17
all of whats been said looks right
a way to speed up this process, or just to make your acoustics tone that much better, is put a speaker up to the soundhole and play music into youre guitar
you want to be able to feel your guitar vibrate, not shake the thing apart, so dont crank it too much
make sure you play music with a huge tonal range too, unless you want youre guitar to sound specifically bassy or treble-ish
if you can get youre hands on a several octave sine wave(i think thats what its called) youll be set
#18
One of my friends has a 10 year old, solid top Martin. It sounds fine, but he says it doesn't sound nearly as good as it did when it was younger. He's taken really good care of it, but it seems to have gotten worse.

On the other hand, I have a solid Larrivee I bought three years ago. At the time, I liked the sound, but really bought it for how awesome it felt. Now, even after that short amount of time, it sounds like a completely different guitar. The tone is amazing, especially compared to what it used to be.

That's basically a really long way of saying in my experience, there's really no real way to tell how it will sound down the line. If you take good care of it and play a lot, it should end up sounding pretty amazing.