#1
If im tuning my bass to different tunings using a tuner, do I just tune the bass until the tuner says its at the note im looking for? or is the tuner only going to be accurate when tuning to standard?
#2
Different tuners do different stuff.

Cheap ones will only do standard.
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#3
depends what sort of tuner it is, a good chromatic one should have no problem, as for me i have a crappy one and to put my bass into drop-d or something like that i need to hold the string at the second fret o_O
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#4
A lot of tuners that only tune in standard have a flat symbol on it. Hit that, and button once, and only tune your E string (which will be D now). Then hit it a few times until the flat goes away, and tune the rest of it.

Now you're in Drop D

To get Drop C, do the same thing, only two flats on the E and one on the other strings.

I have a Korg tuner that does it by whole notes, so I'm assuming thats what most do.
#5
yea, my tuner has a 'flat' button on it. but you may have to hit the flat button 2 times in order to go down a whole step. i think it only goes one half step down everytime you hit it.
#7
Quote by BlueShox
A lot of tuners that only tune in standard have a flat symbol on it. Hit that, and button once, and only tune your E string (which will be D now). Then hit it a few times until the flat goes away, and tune the rest of it.

Now you're in Drop D

To get Drop C, do the same thing, only two flats on the E and one on the other strings.

I have a Korg tuner that does it by whole notes, so I'm assuming thats what most do.


For most tuners of this type, Drop D would actually need 2 flat symbols for the E string as it is a whole step down. Drop C would have to have 4 flats on the E as it is 2 whole steps down and the rest of the strings would have 2 flats. Why would your Korg represent a 2 step drop with the symbol for a semitone?

C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C... ------> Higher
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#8
I'm not sure, now that you mention it that sounds more right. I haven't used that tuner since I had an acoustic guitar, which is a very long time.

I have a chromatic tuner for the bass.
#9
Quote by alucardmik
depends what sort of tuner it is, a good chromatic one should have no problem, as for me i have a crappy one and to put my bass into drop-d or something like that i need to hold the string at the second fret o_O


Just play 4th string at the 12th natural harmonic. This should register in D one octave higher, which is the same as your 2nd string.
#10
Quote by Fast_Bear
http://www.tunemybass.com/

Can you tune by ear yet? If so, THERE YAH GO!

Yes, yes, yes. Throw the tuner away and stop being a baby. Learn by ear. Hell, all I do is tune my G string and tune the rest with harmonics (I can tune the G string by ear, too). Then, I check tunemybass to see if my G string is still in tune (maybe the neck bow made it a little flat) and do it again.

As far as alternate tunings, I've never ever used a tuner for one. I always use open strings and change whatever string I need to to be the open note. I'll fret a note if I have to. If I can tune my 7-string to open D by ear, anyone can! Believe in yourself!
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