#1
I'm thinking about trying out for one of my schools jazz bands (they're are 4 of varying talent) and I was wondering what I should know how to do. I have a basic grasp of theory and can read music veery slowly, and know chords and CAGED pretty well, but I was wondering, if anyone else is a guitarist for a jazz band, what I should get down and master before I try out?
#2
i think you should be able to play augmented and ninth chords, that's what my director told me so i'm playing saxophone ha ha
#4
lots of 7 and m7 chords. like, learn every one of those CAGED chords with the major and minor 7th.

also a lot of dim chords and other random stuff. you'll be fine as long as you stick to the sevenths.
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#5
If you see a chord you don't know, you're usually pretty safe playing it as some form of 7th chord. When I first started I was having difficulty playing strange chords such as _9ths, _7#5s, _7b9 and countless other foreign chords.

Then I started looking for different chord shapes and voicings and so far none of the chords have been difficult at all.
#6
Like everyone's said, just learn as many chords as you can. If you have a basic idea of how chords are made up, then it should be pretty easy to understand almost everything. And reading individual notes on sheet music just takes practice. I still don't have it downpat.
#7
Dude, **** the 11ths and 13ths and ****. Just play sevenths. Theres a movable form for a seventh and ninth chord, learn those. Just know theory and be able to solo well, and sight read. Get "THE REAL BOOK" from your teacher or buy it and spend like an hour a day sightreading. In like a week you'll improve your sightreading by 100%, seriously. And on soloing, to whoever asked, for example, if its in Gm, just solo in Gm pentatonic, as long as you have an understanding of phrasing you'll be okay. If its in a major key, just solo in the major key (it helps to know all modes in all keys if you don't like sounding like ****).
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#8
While you may be able to get by with one or two 7th forms for now, I wouldn't use that as an excuse to not learn other voicings. When you're sight-reading fast chord changes, it helps if you can play most chords while only having to move a few frets. Plus, you may want to change your voicing depending on what the other members of the band are doing.
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