#1
Anyone have some thoughts and methods on how to diversify the sequence of notes played in a scale, is just deliberately noodling a good idea? Or should you practice various methods, such as the hopscotch posted on this site?
Quote by Timothy Leary
They've outlawed the number one vegetable on the planet.


Start a fire for a man and keep him warm for a day, start that same man on fire and he will be warm for life.
#2
Use all the techniques you've learned on this site, as well as licks you've either found yourself or heard from your favorite guitarists. If you combine all the techniques you've learned as well as cool licks you've learned it will greatly diversify the scale you are playing.
Quote by ch715dallat
Necrophagist how could all you n00bs forget the best german metalcore band ever. i think theyre tech metalcore tho or sumfin
#3
don't be timid about deviating form the scale when your ears tell you something sounds good. I think after you've devoted some time to practice noodling is great just don't noodle all the time. Some of the best ideas I've come up with were just from noodling around after practicing.
#4
From what I've read of edg's recommendations, Sheets of Sound would be right up your alley. Its a book full of ways to move through a scale, I think.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
I would also recommend playing through scales in intervals, including thirds, fourths and fifths. So usually you play 12345678, but in thirds you would play 132435465768798 (the numbers refer to a scale degree).

Also practice accenting different notes, most people play a scale accenting the first note of each pair (like Cd Ef Ga Bc), but it can help with your phrasing to be able to play a scale run with any notes accented, so maybe (cDe fGa bC).
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



Because footstools are cool - UG's Classical Guitarists


PM Marmoseti or Confusius to join
#6
play scales in 3rds, 4ths, 5ths, and 6ths, over and over, then start incorperating those into your playing
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#7
Ok so basically what im getting from your well appreciated responses is that I should start deliberately playing unique sequences in the scales, and phrase on notes not often phrased.

I also am trying to decide which method would be a more practical approach to apply new scales I learn, through mastering the notes on the fretboard and applying the formulas, or simply preparing my own box positions?
Quote by Timothy Leary
They've outlawed the number one vegetable on the planet.


Start a fire for a man and keep him warm for a day, start that same man on fire and he will be warm for life.
#8
Quote by Ænimus Prime
From what I've read of edg's recommendations, Sheets of Sound would be right up your alley. Its a book full of ways to move through a scale, I think.


Yep. If you're an improvisor, you should get it. period.

It really helps to make your fingers do things they wouldn't normally do. And do
enough of that until it gets spontaneous. Otherwise, they'll just spontaneously do
the same stuff over and over. You tend to wear a rut in the carpet that way....

Quote by Americanhoser

I also am trying to decide which method would be a more practical approach to apply new scales I learn, through mastering the notes on the fretboard and applying the formulas, or simply preparing my own box positions?


Not sure what you mean. Basically just use whatever finger positions you already
know from a scale and learn new patterns through them -- not just going linearly
up & down (in 2nds).

Do you use 3 note per string fingerings? It makes it a hell of a lot easier ....
Last edited by edg at Sep 17, 2007,