#1
What would happen to a guitar signal if you forced it through a resistor, IE if you put a resistor in series with it? I have a wiring schematic that may (depending on the situation) put a resistor between two pickups wired in series, and I'm just curious if it should have much of an effect.
#2
Think about it from this point of view: Your volume pot is a resistor. It's resistance varies from 0 to 500k or whatever its value. Putting another resistor in series with the output is the same as turning your volume down. Or off, if you pick too high a value.

Putting a resistor in series after one of the pickups in a series wired pair would drop the signal of the first relative to the second. A blend pot does precisely the same thing, only variably.
#3
Actually a volume pot is configured as a voltage divider, but whatever. You still end up going through a resistor.

TS- Guitar signal is forced through resistors all the time- in your volume and tone knobs, in your pedals, in your EQ, and in your amp. It just makes it quieter.
#4
It doesn't always make it quieter. Just to clear that up

It would mess about with the input and output impedances of the guitar and the amp, causing it to be quieter in most cases. You would also lose some of the treble from the signal due to it being attenuated to an inaudible level.

If you shove it through 2 resistors and an op-amp, it can make it quite a bit louder...
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#6
Quote by cokeisbetter
^ Yeah, but just putting it through a resistor makes it quieter.

as i said it depends on the loading put on it, and the location of it within the guitar signal path etc, you could position it in such a way that it prevents the guitar from being turned down to 0 volume, another place where it would have no effect, another place where it would make the guitar sound more trebley
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#7
But he's asking about a resistor in series with the signal. If you have the signal, then a resistor with nowhere else to go, then it'll make it quieter. I know that you can do other things with them, I'm no noob.
#8
Just testing but putting in between the hot output of the volume and the input of the tone (still technically in series with the signal path) then it would just cut less treble. But yeah, due to impedance mismatching, it would cut the signal.

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#9
Quote by mcw00t
as i said it depends on the loading put on it, and the location of it within the guitar signal path etc, you could position it in such a way that it prevents the guitar from being turned down to 0 volume, another place where it would have no effect, another place where it would make the guitar sound more trebley


ah
looks like nothing has changed since i've been gone


at any rate, to make this thread useful,

running an unamplified guitar signal through a resistor will make the volume drop,

it can also cut the treble a little, not much, and maybe not even noticeable

there are ways you can use a resistor to make the guitar louder after the volume is turned down, but you'll also mess up the sweep of your potentiometer.


so, essentially, there isnt really a use for just a resistor in a guitar circuit, pedals and such are a different story, but just in a guitar, you'd be better off without.
#10
and just what do you mean by that?
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#11
Quote by mcw00t
and just what do you mean by that?


it means people still argue here like little children

did i studder?
do i need to break it down for you further?

because i will gladly use smaller words for you
#12
looks like someone's in a bit of a mood...and I'm quite alright with long words, thanks anyway.

It wasn't exactly an argument either, just you presumed it was.

Now how about we stop expecting everyone to be an asshole, and get along with each other, yes?
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#13
Quote by mcw00t
looks like someone's in a bit of a mood...and I'm quite alright with long words, thanks anyway.

It wasn't exactly an argument either, just you presumed it was.

Now how about we stop expecting everyone to be an asshole, and get along with each other, yes?


ha
nope, no mood here
im actually quite chipper

and i presumed it was an argument because there was a good amount of condescending worded statements being made, i could be wrong, wouldn't be the first or last time...

and yea, the majority of people on here are condescending assholes, in case you didn't notice..
#14
^ ha, insufferable

Anyways, thanks for the tips. And I wouldn't normally want a resistor there, but I have a difficult-to-explain design that may require a pot acting as a pot for one pickup, and a straight up resistor for another. I'm trying to find a way to make a volume pot and a tone pot for alexplorer's awesome rotary switches designs. The problem is that if you make the pots how you normally would for two pups that'll be parallel, then in series each pot will be a master pot over the other. it's a tough one
#15
Quote by sempri_fi
ha
nope, no mood here
im actually quite chipper

and i presumed it was an argument because there was a good amount of condescending worded statements being made, i could be wrong, wouldn't be the first or last time...

and yea, the majority of people on here are condescending assholes, in case you didn't notice..
And you sound like an intelligent person stooping to the same level as them. Why do that? You'd be more effective if you just added to the conversation, pointed out the mistakes, which you appear to know quite a lot about, and not resort to name-calling.
Quote by flashbandit
What would happen to a guitar signal if you forced it through a resistor, IE if you put a resistor in series with it? I have a wiring schematic that may (depending on the situation) put a resistor between two pickups wired in series, and I'm just curious if it should have much of an effect.


As was previously mentioned, a resistor ALONE, has little effect on the volume of a signal, when placed in series with a high impedance load.

But your desciption was extremely vague on where the resistance is, what value, etc.

The ONLY way to answer a question like this, is to see the application. Please include a drawing or delete the thread entirely. The vagueness of the OP makes this a prime target for a flame fest. People will give diametrically opposed answers depending on what they THINK you mean. And argue because they are RIGHT.

The problem is, they are all answering a different question. YOU have set them up to fail. You might not have intended to, but that's the result of a vague OP.


...
Meadows
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#16
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
The vagueness of the OP makes this a prime target for a flame fest. People will give diametrically opposed answers depending on what they THINK you mean. And argue because they are RIGHT.

The problem is, they are all answering a different question. YOU have set them up to fail. You might not have intended to, but that's the result of a vague OP.


...


Now that's just about the smartest thing I have seen in a while on here. Things change quite a bit when you have an LP vs. a Strat for instance. Sometimes my brain gets stuck in Strat mode, as I have 2 at the moment, so I answer with Strat wiring in my head, ignoring the downright wrongness of my answer when applied to a different diagram. Clarity is key.