#1
So i go on all these sites and tutorials on how to solo right.. but i don't get it.. can someone just give me a flat out answer on what to do? is it just hitting notes out of a key the same as the song from a scale.. or what lol.
#2
You need to hit notes in a scale, do bends, slides, hit some notes that aren't in the scale, don't be afraid to experiment.
#3
right. so any idea what scales to learn? i already learned pentatonic minor, and the Aeolian scale.. don't mind my spelling.. are there certain scales that sound better with certain types of music?
#4
Playing someone else's solo is just hitting the notes you're told to hit. You can go out of key, out of scale, anything-- if it sounds right.

When composing your own solo, try to put some thought into it, not constant note playing. A solo can involve any technique (legato, sweep picking, tapping, etc.) if you think it sounds good.

No, music is never about just hitting notes in a scale.

Edit: Check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWHKeC4IEgA

It might show you some neat scales and phrasing you should try.
#6
you just need the feeling, but once you get that feeling, it is amazing. its almost like a revelation, and you feel like the top of the world.
Quote by AgentWiggles
Thanks, douche.


Quote by SlayingDragons
Dude...



Gear:
Ibanez SZ 520QM
Ibanez RG 450DXB
Fender Big Apple Stratocaster
Pod XT Live
Peavey XXX Half Stack
Peavey Bandit 112
and a soul of Rock n' Roll
#7
but my soloing doesn't sound like it fits... any nice sounding scale recommendations?
#9
Depends on what chords are being played in the background. There are lessons on here that show you the scales and modes, you can just go through them until you find one you like.

You could write the solo and then write the background that sounds good with it, or do it the other way around. Play some Vai and Satch, or for simpler stuff, Santana and Hendrix. After you learn other people's stuff, you can start making your own off of them. It's always good to have some influence.

Most likely though, learn some major and minor scales. I personally believe it has more to do with phrasing than scales.
#11
The difference between saying, "Hope you burn in hell" and "hope you enjoy your eternal damnation". Phrasing is what separates genres of music.

Check out some Santana, he is godly with phrasing.

Ok better description. It's the difference between waiting two seconds to slide lower on a note and waiting one. Saying "I love you" to your mother or your wife.
#12
ok i have a question.
like ok for example metallicas master of puppets
is that in a certain key?does a song have to stay in one key the whole time?or can it go outside and not go in a particular key?does the solo only have to be in key and use scales?
Originally posted by str84ever
Since you are playing metal and from what i know about guitars which is not alot

the pointer the guitar the better it is for metal

problem solved.
#13
Quote by namelessmaggot6
ok i have a question.
like ok for example metallicas master of puppets
is that in a certain key?does a song have to stay in one key the whole time?or can it go outside and not go in a particular key?does the solo only have to be in key and use scales?



nope.. there really are not rules written in stone. in that song theres lot's of notes that go out of key and a couple key changes if i'm not mistaken.
#14
Quote by namelessmaggot6
ok i have a question.
like ok for example metallicas master of puppets
is that in a certain key?does a song have to stay in one key the whole time?or can it go outside and not go in a particular key?does the solo only have to be in key and use scales?


It's preferred. You'd have to just google "hey what scale is Master of Puppets in?" and it's answered somewhere. A lot of people go out of key during a solo. But, (check out the acoustic version of "Layla" by Clapton) some people go in and out of key for the chorus and verses.

Music theory is not about keeping you in line, it's just about improving your knowledge. You can do anything as long as it sounds nice to you. Music theory just helps you along.
#16
Again that's up to you. It's up to the whole emotional aspect of music, do you want to play fast for a song or for your jamming? Does it sound nice?

I mean, if you go out of scale, key, or tempo, Hendrix isn't going to float down from heaven and guitar-slap you.

Just do what sounds good and what you hear in your head/heart.
#19
Learn solos by your favorite guitarists and use their licks and patterns in your playing.

(miss me? )
#21
I can't believe nobody mentioned that you have to play with some rhythm, even the most wrong notes can sound great when the rhythm behind them is solid. Don't be afraid to play with a contrasting rhythm either, but keep everything on the same pulse.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#22
Quote by Prophet of Page
I can't believe nobody mentioned that you have to play with some rhythm, even the most wrong notes can sound great when the rhythm behind them is solid. Don't be afraid to play with a contrasting rhythm either, but keep everything on the same pulse.


*smacks self repeatedly* He's absolutely right and I did forget that.

Play the too rhythm and always recognize the rhythm when playing the solo or everything will just sound messy. I say, try out the acoustic "Layla". (Yes, indeed, I love that song. )
#23
Quote by Eminored
I mean, if you go out of scale, key, or tempo, Hendrix isn't going to float down from heaven and guitar-slap you.


I LOL'ed. The most important thing is, don't think "No! I can't play that!" Play what sounds right.
#24
Soloing isn't something you can just be told to do. You need to learn your notes, and figure out what notes sound good with others. It's up to you.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#25
It begins with understanding how scales work over chords. If you don't get some understanding of that, you'll find it difficult. The fumbling around approach until it
sounds right isn't all that great (and not really all that satisfying).

But you have to understand what that means in context. It does NOT mean you
have to play certain notes. It means that someone that knows what they're
doing can play a "wrong" note and make it sound good, whereas someone who
doesn't it will sound like a clam.

And yes, the rhythym. The strength of the phrasing has a higher priority than
a note must match the underlying harmony. That's another concept that can work
for you.

I'd suggest, for learning to solo, start with the Blues. There's just so many good reasons to start with that.
#26
You can go in an out of scale, hit any note you want, if it makes you sound good. Now of course, if you plan to jam with a band and have some backing chords or rhythm of some sort behind you, then you're probably better off knowing what sounds good with that specific rhythm.

Basically, you should definitely learn scales, know a whole bunch of theory stuff so that you don't have to think about it when you need to apply it. However, theory is meant as a guideline, you do not have to do whatever a book tells you is right.

Music is about feeling, expression, and enjoyment IMO. Not rules and the difference between right and wrong. Don't overthink what notes you hit, don't pull a "is that in the right scale?" and then stop to figure it out. If it sounds bad, don't do it again, or try to make it sound good. If you like it, right it down and keep going with it.
#27
Learn your theory. Learn some solos. Learn to keep steady rythm. Rock out.