#1
I should probably learn both, but what do you guys read most of the time? Other than tabs that is.
#2
bass clef... duh well actually I guess bass clarinet and baritone sax both read treble but... yeah bass reads bass clef. it's always useful to know both though... epecially since treble is more "common."
#3
Sorry but i laughed when i read this. Not that it's a really dumb question because if you don't know to begin with you can only guess so you might as well ask. It's just that the name sort of implies....ya know, bass clef.

Most of it will be in bass clef as the low E is about here:

BASS CLEF:
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
- <--------there on(directly covering) the first ledger line below the bass clef.

Of course the high G goes up to:

TREBLE CLEF:
_
____________________ <------there between the top line of the treble clef and
____________________ below what would be the first leger line, so if
____________________ the song was played mostly really high it could be
____________________ written in treble clef.
____________________

But it will almost always be in bass clef.

EDIT: that high G is assuming you have 24 frets.
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Last edited by Revelation at Sep 17, 2007,
#4
More than likely, you'll be using the Bass Clef.
It would just be really annoying to read all of those ledger lines if you transcribed it to the Treble Clef.
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#5
I joined this orchestra. And most of the stuff is in treble. It's... kind of annoying.
So the bass guitar can play the same stuff as alto saxes and b. saxes?

I got a sheet here, called the Turkish March.

I'm assuming it's the alto and b. sax, because the only other bass clef is the tuba and the trombone
#6
generally you only have to worry about bass cleff cos thats the only thing you have to read, unless of corse you do musician ship or something, where its expected that all musicians can read both
#7
( i play double bass in a jazz band, a symphony orchestra and a blues band and ive never had to read treble cleff)
#8
TBH in typical sheet music setting you'll be using bass clef, but it modern music you'll be using quite a bit of the treble clef. That is, unless you want to deal with 8va and all that stuff.
#9
you could but it'd be down an octave at least probably. and also usually the bass would play the trombone or tuba part in that situation as it's range fits them better. Also look out because those instruments are not in the key of C if I remember correctly so have a sax player play an A for you and see if it matches your A.
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Quote by the_perdestrian
listen to revelation, for he is wise in the way of bass-fu
#11
Its been a while since I played in a band / orchestra, but if memory servers me correctly ,alto and bari saxs are Eb instruments (tenor is in Bb). Even though its a baritone, the music for bari is written in treble clef.

Bass guitar is a C instrument and the music for it is written in bass clef.

The instruments that you mention are transposing instruments, which means the music is written in a different pitch than concert pitch. You can play any music on bass, but if its written for a transposing instrument you are going to have to adjust the pitch accordingly.

As far as reading bass and treble, learning both can allow you to play any piece of music. After picking up bass guitar, I finally learned bass clef and now can jump from reading one to the other without too much trouble.
#12
Bass fisherman usually use lures, but sometimes live bait. Bad analogy, I am truly sorry. If you are playing a bass guitar and using sheet music, then play according to the bass clef. If you can also read music with the treble clef, that is excellent. You base your bass line on the bass clef, and you can create your fills using the treble clef. You may not neccessarily use the same notes, but you have a starting point or at least an idea of what the treble instruments are doing and you can interact with that.
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#13
Ok. bass guitar = bass clef.
But problem was when I went to orchestra is that, they didn't have a sheet music with bass clef.
So I'm wondering which sheet music I'd use then if they're all in treble clef.

On my Turkish March sheet music, it says on the very bottom: "E.Bass: to play F#, use your pinky to press the 4th fret, 2nd string."
The only cleff I found with F# was the b.sax(baritone sax?" and alto sax.

Is that possible? To play with the same sheet music as the alto sax and b sax?
#14
^yep

just have to figure out your key signature, which if natural means you have 3 flats (Ab, Eb and Bb)
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#15
Quote by RockettBoy
Ok. bass guitar = bass clef.
But problem was when I went to orchestra is that, they didn't have a sheet music with bass clef.
So I'm wondering which sheet music I'd use then if they're all in treble clef.

On my Turkish March sheet music, it says on the very bottom: "E.Bass: to play F#, use your pinky to press the 4th fret, 2nd string."
The only cleff I found with F# was the b.sax(baritone sax?" and alto sax.

Is that possible? To play with the same sheet music as the alto sax and b sax?


You will be playing Bass Clef which fixes the note F.
The upright and Bass guitar are in concert pitch.
Saxes Trumpets etc are pitched so that they avoid masses of ledger lines.
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#16
Bass and guitar aren't in concert pitch, a low E in concert pitch on the stave is an octave higher than that on bass or guitar. It's the same note name but the octave is different.
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#17
Sinan is correct. Both guitar and bass are in C (8vb), along with contrabassoon and the bass flute.
#18
yeh sinan and anarkee are both correct, personally i can only read bass clef fluently but i can read treble and alto clefs to varying degrees
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#19
mmm I feel as though my question isn't quite answered yet.

Here is the sheet music I am talking about



At the bottom it has a note about the electric bass.

Which one is for the bass guitar?
#20
oh i see. they actually gave you the score... how annoying, now you'll be flipping pages constantly.unless of course you rewrite it out for yourself.

well the second string is the D string and it's 4th fret is F# but i'm not sure why they told you that as it is standard tuning.

by the looks of it the tuba goes down to D so unless you downtune that isn't gonna happen. I'd say go with the trombone part as it fits the range much better and since i play trombone i know that it is written in the key of C so you won't run into that horrible transposing problem like with the saxophones. and it's in bass clef.

EDIT: Just thought i'd mention that it doesn't really specify which one for the bass so that's why i just picked what i thought would work best.
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Quote by the_perdestrian
listen to revelation, for he is wise in the way of bass-fu
Last edited by Revelation at Sep 18, 2007,
#21
Yes, I have to agree with Revelation. The trombone part (written in concert pitch) is your best bet here.

(And you will follow the jazz bassist Jeff Berlin in playing trombone parts on your bass guitar btw)
#22
Thanks a lot guys. Now I can try playing this.
Reading is still a new thing to me.
#23
glad to help. and it was awesome being told i was right by anarkee so thx for the opportunity.
dean edge one 5 string
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Quote by the_perdestrian
listen to revelation, for he is wise in the way of bass-fu
#24
When I played double bass there would occasionally be high parts in tenor clef, one of my books said: "double basses sometimes read notation in treble clef," but I've never actually seen it come up in a piece of music I was playing. Usually if a composer/transcriber is any good at writing he or she will only jump up to tenor clef.
#25
Quote by anarkee
Its been a while since I played in a band / orchestra, but if memory servers me correctly ,alto and bari saxs are Eb instruments (tenor is in Bb). Even though its a baritone, the music for bari is written in treble clef. .

It's a long time since I played Baritone Sax, as you say parts for the Eb Baritone sax were written in Treble Clef, I was also given Bassoon and Euphonium parts to play on the Baritone Sax which were written in Bass Clef which made life more interesting.

PS. Sorry about missing out the 8va Basso and saying concert pitch.
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