#1
What does Am7 mean?

An A minor chord with a major 7th?
An A minor chord with a minor 7th?
An A major chord with a minor 7th?
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#2
A minor 7.

It is an Aminor with a b7.

A C E G
R b3 5 b7

An A minor chord with a major 7th would be AmMaj7.
An A Major chord with a minor 7th would be A7.
#4
That means that if you are playing in A-major, a A7 chord would contain an out-of-scale note?

And it is the same for every ''number'' (interval) in a chord?

I thought that when you say 6th you mean major 6th and when you say b6th you mean minor 6th.
=>Fender Highway 1 Stratocaster with Alnico V Holydiver Bare Knuckle bridge humbucker

=>40 Watt RMS Yorkville Traynor YCV-40 valve amplifier

=>30 Watt Tech 21 NYC - Trademark 30 solid amplifier

=>Dunlop GCB-95 Crybaby pedal
#5
Well, another way of looking at this could be:

Take G major scale. The second mode of the G major scale is A Dorian right? From each mode, a certain 7th chord can be derived. For example, you get dominant 7th chords from mixo. From dorian, you get the minor 7th chord. And how do you do that? Take the first, third, fifth and seventh of the dorian mode. They make a chord, right? That chord is a minor7th. In this case, A-7, but for example the second mode of Cmajor is D Dorian. And from D Dorian you can get D-7 and so on with all the other modes.

The chord is called a minor7th by the actual relations between intervals of the root, 3rd and 7th. These are:

1 b3 5 b7. Note that these are the same alterations of the Dorian mode. 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7. (duh!)

Because this chord is actually built off the second mode, it gets the roman numeral II. If built off mixo(fifth mode) it would get V. Hence why in jazz you many times get a II-V-I progression. All the chords in that progression would be derived from modes. Yeah, the chords would probably be further altered for extra spice but the basic approach...I think.

Go ahead an rip me to shreds if I got anything wrong.
Last edited by confusius at Sep 17, 2007,
#6
Quote by SdKfz
That means that if you are playing in A-major, a A7 chord would contain an out-of-scale note?

And it is the same for every ''number'' (interval) in a chord?

I thought that when you say 6th you mean major 6th and when you say b6th you mean minor 6th.

If you are playing in A Major then an A7 chord would be out of key, yes. On the same hand though each key has only one 7 chord, the dominant 7. This is one of the reasons for perfect cadences. In the key of A the dominant 7 is an E7.

For other intervals the "number" refers to a Major interval, yes. So an A6 chord would be:

A C# E F#
R 3 5 6

This changes when you get into compound intervals. If you want that explaining just ask.
#7
Quote by Chris_Sleeps
If you are playing in A Major then an A7 chord would be out of key, yes. On the same hand though each key has only one 7 chord, the dominant 7. This is one of the reasons for perfect cadences. In the key of A the dominant 7 is an E7.

For other intervals the "number" refers to a Major interval, yes. So an A6 chord would be:

A C# E F#
R 3 5 6

This changes when you get into compound intervals. If you want that explaining just ask.


That means that:

=>The dominant chord contains a major 3rd and a minor 7th (and a 5th).
=>In every major key only the 5th forms a dominant chord.
=>In every minor key only the b7th forms a dominant chord.
=>We never say a F#b7 chord.

Are those sentences right?
=>Fender Highway 1 Stratocaster with Alnico V Holydiver Bare Knuckle bridge humbucker

=>40 Watt RMS Yorkville Traynor YCV-40 valve amplifier

=>30 Watt Tech 21 NYC - Trademark 30 solid amplifier

=>Dunlop GCB-95 Crybaby pedal