#1
Ok, So today I changed the strings on a floyd rose tremolo for t he first time ever... and i'm having some major problems.

The bridge wont stay parallel to the guitar, no matter how much I tighten the springs in the back.

The strings WILL NOT stay in tune, which I'm supposing is because theyre new strings, but no other new strings have ever done this much detuning so I dunno.

The strings are much farther from the bridge than they were before.

I'm thinkin this may have something to do with the gauges? I went from a set of .009's to a set of .010's.


So... if anyone could point me in the right direction that would be awesome
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#2
Yeah... most Floyd guitars are set to gauge 9 as far as I know, so probably your truss rod isn't set up properly. Try some gauge 9 strings, or have your truss rod adjusted.
Btw, Floyds are always a bitch to change strings with or to tune. What I did is I just locked the thing with two wooden blocks at the back of my guitar, I don't use my trem that often anyway.
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#3
hmm. once you get it in tune without the locking nut on doo some whammying like pull-ups and such. then retune. and do it again. then retune.

or add a spring.
my floyd also has a problem with the springs not pulling enough so like screws are way in the wood.
just tighten them up. or you could change the shape of them.
like maybe put the middle spring closer to the top one.
or maybe v shape the springs.

and floyds are not hard to set-up if you have a lttiel bit of patience.
and its not your truss rod that is making you guitar de-tune.
#4
Quote by wongacaster
and its not your truss rod that is making you guitar de-tune.


Right, but when you change gauges you need to adjust your truss rod otherwise it just doesn't fit properly with frets etc.
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#7
IT IS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE TRUSS ROD

TS - when you upped gauges you increased the overall tension of the strings. Your guitar is set up for 9's, so the tension of the tremolo springs is equal to the tension of a set on 9's in standard tuning. The 10's will have more tension so you need to increase the tension of the springs in the tremolo cavity by tightening the screws.

It will take a LONG time to get right, probably the best part of an hour. Tuning a floyd takes a long time anyway, because it's floating you have to keep re-tuning as changing one string affects all the others. However, you're not only having to zero in on your tuning, you have to zero in on the correct spring tension too.

Hopefully you changed strings one at a time, if you took them all of your bridge will be way out of whack and it might take even longer. Also your strings will need stretching once you have the tension balanced...just grab them and pull them a few times to stretch the slack out of them otherwise they'll de-tune on their own.

The moral of this story? Don't dick around with a guitar with a floating bridge unless you know what you're doing
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#8
Quote by steven seagull
IT IS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE TRUSS ROD

TS - when you upped gauges you increased the overall tension of the strings. Your guitar is set up for 9's, so the tension of the tremolo springs is equal to the tension of a set on 9's in standard tuning. The 10's will have more tension so you need to increase the tension of the springs in the tremolo cavity by tightening the screws.

It will take a LONG time to get right, probably the best part of an hour. Tuning a floyd takes a long time anyway, because it's floating you have to keep re-tuning as changing one string affects all the others. However, you're not only having to zero in on your tuning, you have to zero in on the correct spring tension too.

Hopefully you changed strings one at a time, if you took them all of your bridge will be way out of whack and it might take even longer. Also your strings will need stretching once you have the tension balanced...just grab them and pull them a few times to stretch the slack out of them otherwise they'll de-tune on their own.

The moral of this story? Don't dick around with a guitar with a floating bridge unless you know what you're doing



Yes. It has to do with the string tension in the back. When you change gauges to a higher gauge, some slight height adjustment may be needed as well.